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It really depends on how far down the piston travels in the bore as well as if this is the thrust side of the piston or not. If the piston skirt travels lower than where the chip is at, the only option you'd have to reuse the block is to get a new cylinder liner installed into the block. In most cases with small engines, this doesn't make economic sense. You ...


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TLDR: To do it right and not have to do it again in a month (or possibly right after start up), the only way to fix this is to either pull the crankshaft and have it turned, as well as check the connecting rod, or replace the engine (might make more economic sense to do this, depending on the engine). There's a whole other part to this nobody here is seeming ...


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The picture is a rod bearing . Push the rod up and hand turn the crank so you get emory around the journal. I think you can get some level of repair by running emery cloth over the journal. If the mic shows it still in tolerance you may get lucky with one rod bearing replacement. However , because you say it was caused by low oil, all the bearings saw low ...


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The bearing material is softer than the crankshaft, so any imperfections will chew up the bearing. There is no way you will get an accurately cylindrical shape with the correct diameter and surface finish using emery paper, even if you think you have polished out the scratches. Any imperfections in the shape will also tend to destroy the oil film in the ...


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If you bodge it then you get to take the engine out a second time - good for practice... So, mic up the bearing surfaces and if it is not perfect then get it machined. If you want an idea of what the bearing has to do, take the bearing diameter, multiply by pi and then by 2000 or 3000 to get an idea of the linear speed. If the surface is slightly damaged ...


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