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12

There are tools available that can do the job without using a press: There are many more. The overall theme is the C-clamp like stile of pressing the bearing in and out. There is an old saying, there is a right tool for the job. These or a press is the right tool. There are other ways but you always run the risk of damaging the bearing, knuckle or both.


11

At ~110k on the clock it's quite likely that it's the original clutch, and if so you're going to be significantly closer to the end of the clutch's life than the start. Given the big labor cost/effort in getting the transmission out it's likely to be the sensible option in the long run to replace the clutch now while you've got it apart.


8

It might not be the tires so much as the alignment. If the bearing was worn but had "gotten settled" in a particular orientation, it might not have been noisy. Then you changed the alignment and started stressing it slightly differently, and now it's gotten loud. I wouldn't be too quick to blame the mechanic.


7

The two primary bearing types found on a crankshaft are roller bearings and plain bearings located on the main journals of a crankshaft. There are two types of journals on a crankshaft. Main Journal - Where the crankshaft main bearings would be located Rod/Offset Journal - Where the connecting rod bearings would be located Crankshaft Components Image ...


6

I don't think it's safe/wise to drive 80 miles on that. It needs to be put on a trailer and dragged home at son's expense (some insurances cover towing also, but 80 miles is a bit far. If you have a truck, maybe rent a trailer for the day)


6

My options would be to replace the shaft were it sits now. No fun as a "flat back" job but it is not very hard. Or tow it to a repair site. It does not look like it should be driven. A driveshaft that gets loose can cause lots of damage. Removing the shaft and driving without one in place is not an option as this would likely damage the dual pump drive ...


5

To determine whether it's coming from the hub (and on which side), shift into neutral and lift the front of the car. (Set the parking brake and block the wheels very well!) Spin the wheel rapidly with your hand. You should be able to hear the same noise. To repair, usually you replace the hub. It is possible to repair a hub by repacking the bearings, but it ...


5

Since when a wheel bearing goes bad you can feel it more than you can hear it, and there usually isn't any deflection in the wheel itself until the bearing is pretty much shot, the way I usually check for the bad bearing is with an automotive stethoscope: What I do is this: Put the car up on jack stands Take the wheel off of the car (if you need to ...


5

I've had this issue with cars fixed at my past shops. The old tires would mask the sound of the wheel bearing starting to go bad. New tires would suddenly make the sound stand out. Old tires can also affect the wheel bearing if their wear is uneven. They could put uneven pressure on the bearing as the tire rotates. Could the shop have done it? There is a ...


5

One tire with a months usage more than the other three will not be a cause of any issues. If you have a tire that is substantially different in circumference to the others, that's bad (which is why all four are generally changed at the same time) - but the damage is usually related to the differentials, not to the wheel bearings. Your tire did NOT cause the ...


5

It was untightened lug nuts, period .Unfortunately , I have done that. Miraculously , I can tell about it. Just as your photo ; all my nuts were missing, 2 studs had broken by fatigue. I had a Nissan Titan , 6 lug aluminium wheel. I rotated tires for a trip, forgot to torque one front wheel. Drove about 1100 miles on interstate, 60 to 75 mph. I felt a ...


5

In a word: Absolutely. The bearing you are pointing out is the carrier bearing for the differential, which keeps lateral movement (forward/aft) of the ring gear to a minimum (if not non-existent). If the carrier bearing is destroyed, chances are your ring/pinion gears are both destroyed as well. (NOTE: The above is changed after a clarifying comment from @...


5

I've replaced bearings without either a puller or a press, it's perfectly doable, although a bearing insertion set does make things much easier. These are cheap and you can get them off the internet. Failing that you can do without. Bearing race removal: First you need a hammer, punch, gloves, safety glasses, a torch and a piece of scrap wood to go ...


4

Throw out bearings (TOB) usually make noise when only when you press the clutch pedal. The reason for this is, it is the only time it is engaged and actually can make a noise. If you are hearing this particular noise at 2000-3000 rpm when you aren't actuating the clutch, this can be ruled out almost immediately. Input shaft bearing will make noise most of ...


4

I agree this sounds more like a brake pad issue than a wheel bearing issue. The main reason is, with a wheel bearing issue, you will feel it more than you'll hear it. When the wheel bearing is bad enough to hear it, it's to the point where it is a true safety issue and you shouldn't be driving it anymore. If it were the wheel bearing at this point, you'd ...


4

Just like any other bearing in any automotive engine, it needs a constant source of oil in order to keep spinning. It does this by utilizing oil galleries which are drilled throughout the block. These are fed oil from the oil pump, which draws oil (in most cases) from the oil pan reservoir. Since I know Small Block Chevrolet (GenI) engines, I'll use them as ...


4

Axle repair bearings are used when the surface of the axle is chewed up by the old bearing. The repair bearing moves the location of where the bearing rollers ride to a smooth location on the axle. Depending on the vehicle this relocation may not leave enough room for a proper axle seal on the outside of the bearing. In these cases the seal is relocated to ...


4

You take the nominal diameter of the existing bearing and using the result of the plastigauge add / subtract to get to the diameter you need, then that gives you the amount of over or undersize bearing you should source.


4

Realistically, if your rod journals are worn, you'll need to take it to the machine shop to have the crankshaft inspected and reground if it can be done. The machinist (or shop) will then figure out if the crankshaft is serviceable. If it isn't, you'll need to get a new one (or a refurbished replacement). If it can be ground and made serviceable, your ...


4

It will almost definitely be cheaper to buy a reconditioned engine and drop that in than trying to sort out a seized engine. This is because you're going to have to pay for a lot of machining work in addition to replacing all the damaged parts. Even if you're saving some money on the labour aspect by doing the tear down and reassembly yourself.


3

Several suppliers sell a hub and bearing assembly. While more expensive it makes replacement a one trip job. There is no need to bring the assembly to a shop to have the hub removed and installed from the bearing. It does appear that once the rotor is removed you have access to the four bolts that retain the bearing to the knuckle. It will also require the ...


3

It is definitely not the same between a 4x4 and a 4x2 vehicle. The major difference between the two is that in a 4x4 application, there is the drive shaft which runs through the middle of the hub. You have to remove this in order to get to the bearing. 4wd is much more involved than a 2wd. Not knowing which year of vehicle you have, I cannot tell you exactly ...


3

Journal bearings have a small hole to constantly supply oil for lubrication. They do not rely on oil coming from the surrounding vicinity. That said, it is possible to run the bearing dry if there is insufficient oil pressure or the tolerance between the camshaft and bearing is too little, but the former scenario is an indication of bigger problems while ...


3

It depends on the size of the spindle and whether it is a straight spindle or not (more than likely it is straight). There are two common sizes for small trailers (I believe). It should be the A14 bearing set for the 1" spindle, or A6 set for the 1 1/4" spindle. If in the US, you should be able to pick these up from any of the major parts stores (AutoZone, ...


3

Unfortunately there is no way to fix what ails your Ford here. You'll need to replace the spindle, hub, and I believe rotor as well (it appears the hub and rotor are one piece - is this correct?). There is no way to salvage this with out taking it to a machine shop, unless you have some mad machining skills (which I assume you don't, or you'd know the answer ...


3

After a while, steering bearings can become filled with grit and grime, causing steering to feel not so smooth. Here are the steps to cleaning and greasing your steering bearings so that steering feels smooth and fluid again. Disassembly - In order to keep up with bolts, hand tighten bolts back in their respective receptor holes after removing components. ...


3

The parking brake may not be releasing on that wheel. The parking brake cable may be damaged or rusted. Its also possible that the hydraulic cylinder in the brake caliper is stuck. Another possibility is the caliper pins which allow the caliper to stay centered over the rotor are corroded. You should inspect the parking brake cabling to ensure smooth ...


3

This is a bit of a difficult question to answer over the internet because none of us can physically be there to observe the symptoms you're describing. However though, cars are just like any other man made functional device used on a daily basis. You could go in for an oil change and your piston rod bearing could fail. Is this the lube shop's fault? There is ...


3

Sounds more like brake pads are worn out. But with the possible safety issues I would agree with the other answer or comment that this should be looked at by someone knowledgeable ASAP.


3

I would not try to grease the bearings. Normally a bearing this size is sealed by either a rubber ring (designation suffix 2RS) or a steel sheet ring (designation suffix 2Z), so just slopping some grease on it wont solve the problem. Metal sheet covered bearings are protected against dust but not against moisture, rubber covered ones are protected against ...


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