Hot answers tagged

29

Yes, this is a bad battery. One of the cells has most likely shorted. Each cell is a little above 2vdc. A fully charged battery will usually be ~13vdc. If you lose one cell, it will drop it down ~2vdc, which puts it right down in the arena of 10.5vdc. A direct short inside of a cell will allow electrons to pass through the short instead of raising the ...


28

The main reason those would be sticking out of your battery post/terminal is because the terminal clamp has become too stretched. Someone put the copper wire in there to take up the slack of the clamp. Without them you'd lose connection and the battery would not provide the power to get the car started as well as the system having the ability to charge the ...


27

If the battery is completely dead, especially after sitting for two years, it most likely won't take a charge. Without the battery getting charged, you most likely don't have enough juice coming through the jumper cables to give it the power it needs to turn the Aztec over. Double check the voltage at the battery without the jumper cables on it. If it is ...


23

As Miracle Max would say, there's two kinds of dead batteries, and there's a big difference between them. Mostly Dead This is the most common kind of dead battery. Let's say your battery is rated for 300 cold cranking amps. After several years of use, it degrades until it reaches, say, 250 amps. Your battery isn't out of power, it just can't get your engine ...


13

It's the battery Starting an engine takes a much larger energy impulse than jumper cables can deliver directly through their typically-thin wires and the small surface area of their alligator clamps. (Unless you use very heavy jumper cables). So the way jump starting works, is you slowly add enough energy to the weak battery until it's charged up enough ...


12

It looks to me as the battery has been boiled, meaning the alternator overcharged it. This has several implications: If the alternator overcharged it, then it will do so again. If this is the case, you need to have the alternator tested to ensure the internal regulator is fully functioning. Overcharging is as bad (or worse) than undercharging. You can do a ...


12

Those types of chargers are designed to provide short bursts of power to start a car, most do not have a battery charging mode. Once the car is started the alternator will complete charging the battery. Some of these chargers have a USB output for charging phones, but they don't have the capacity to charge a car battery back to full.


10

Others have already told you the battery is a goner, I'll go into why: When a battery discharges lead sulfate builds up on the plates. It is deposited in very tiny crystals that will covert back to lead and lead oxide when the battery is charged again. However, if the crystals are allowed to sit they slowly merge, forming big crystals. These won't revert ...


9

Have a look at this picture: From here. Corrosion (the green stuff) can conduct electricity. If one wire in that picture went to the battery positive terminal and the other went to the battery negative terminal, then it would act like a connection between the two. Not quite a short circuit, but not an open circuit either. If the cause of the problem ...


8

There are several possibilities: The bike's battery is bad. This is by far the least likely cause, as the previous battery behaved exactly the same way. The chances of having two batteries fail sequentially in the same manner is very low. The battery is not being charged when the motor's running. If there's something awry with the charging circuit or its ...


8

If your engine turns over fast enough with the systems operational in a manner sufficient to start the engine, even if the engine is running only 10-30 seconds, and you've released the key from the start position, the battery/starter circuit is out of the picture. Your assumption is correct.


8

Melting = Heat. Heat in an electrical circuit is caused by resistance. In your case, excessive resistance. If you're replacing batteries, one could guess that you are cleaning the posts and the inside of the connector to the post. That leaves the section where the connector attaches to the cable. If it's a swedged-on cable end, you'll have to replace the ...


7

All batteries last about the same amount of time, given the same climate and average use. I'm betting the dealership uses a large battery warranty to lure you in to other services, like a "loss leader". It's also common with free oil changes when you buy a car at a dealership. They lose money on the oil change but plan on you buying other stuff at a premium.


6

If you do a search for a 78DT battery as on the label on your battery, you will find that it is a dual terminal battery. It has 4 poles, but one of the top ones in your photo has a cap on it. If the cables on your vehicle will reach to the top poles of the existing battery, then you should be able to replace it with a ‘normal’ 2 pole battery with suitable ...


6

They may make 100-months guaranteed batteries with higher real capacity than 60-months ones. Higher capacity means that harmful events like overcurrent or deep discharge are less likely to happen, and that a battery still works fine after losing some of its original capacity, because the remaining capacity is still enough to reliably start the car. I would ...


6

You may just have a bad connection on the battery posts. This would account for the sudden loss of power and also explain why everything powered up once the jump leads were added. Try disconnecting the battery connections and cleaning the connectors and battery post with some sand paper or wire wool, then reconnect. The reason why the car would not start ...


6

Hydrogen is released when a typical car battery is charging. When you remove one jump lead after starting there could be a spark which ignites that hydrogen. It is unlikely to be when you attach the cables – the battery is not at that point being charged. If you attach one cable to a bare metal point on the frame that is not right next to the battery, there ...


6

No, it will not hurt your vehicle. There are other vehicles as you've stated in your excerpt which it might, for the reasons given. Yours is not one of them. There are a couple of caveats: Be aware of is the codes for the radio. Ensure you have them before removing the battery. Along those lines, you'll most likely lose all of your radio settings as well. ...


5

A battery should be able to run the flashers for several hours and still start the car. There should be a sticker on your battery which tells the month and year it was manufactured. The sticker will either be M/YY indicating the month and year, or a code such as D6, where D is the fourth month of the year (sequentially mapped months A-L), and 6 is short for ...


5

In a word: Absolutely The lack of material means a lack of electron flow. You won't get the proper charge of the battery, the right amount of power out of it come starting time, nor the full buffering effect a battery provides to the electrical system. It is a lose/lose/lose situation here. Replace it. It doesn't have to be exactly the same type. In fact, I'...


5

The grease is there to prevent corrosion on the battery terminals, when you put the connector on and tighten it down the grease gets squeezed out and what's left prevents corrosion where there's no metal to metal contact. If your battery came greased then there's no reason to clean the terminals unless the grease got rubbed off and the terminals corroded. If ...


5

The effect of corroded or poorly soldered battery terminals is responsible for excessive voltage drop, not parasitic current drain. They are not the root cause of the parasitic drain.


4

Sounds like your battery terminal connectors are stretched to the point that they are loose even when the bolt is fully tightened. Best fix would be to replace them with new connectors. Alternatively you could add a thin shim of metal between the post and the connector. Since the metal lead (battery post) has a high thermal expansion coefficient, my guess ...


4

The test you are doing is not valid and shows you nothing really. For a start, you have not got it wired in parallel, you have got it wired in series. You would usually wire a voltmeter in parallel to measure voltage. You are therefore measuring the battery voltage with some voltage dropped across whatever is turned on in the car at that moment. In a ...


4

I've heard that AGM is "the best" and that LiPo is "even better" but "much more expensive". However, a standard maintenance-free battery is 30-50€, a LiFePo4 is 40-90€, AGM is >150€. I haven't seen standard LiPo in this size for sale, not through the usual suspects. If by LiPo you mean LiFePO4, then yes, in general lithium ion batteries, when properly used, ...


4

It's the fuel (as well as the battery). After 2 years, the fuel in the tank has almost certainly gone bad. It's most probably also gummed up your fuel injectors. Try spraying some starter fluid down the air intake to see if you can get it to run a little while. If it does, but immediately dies once the starter fluid evaporates, you need new gasoline.


4

The 12v pin on the OBDII should be constant on regardless of the key position. Here is the pin out: You can test it with a multimeter to ensure it is this way in your vehicle. Whether it will work for trickle charging with a solar panel has yet to be seen, but always worth a go.


4

There is no harm as long as the batteries are the same voltage, which they should be. It is recommended not to install a car battery that is LESS in CCA rating than the manufacturer recommends, though installing a higher CCA battery will do no harm, and may actually assist with starting in cold weather conditions.


4

Some electronics are very susceptible to power differences. Most need continuous power in the ~12-14vdc range to function correctly. The starter, on the other hand, will work at lower voltage levels, with enough torque to turn the engine over and get it started. Once the resting voltage of the battery gets below a certain point, the electronics may start ...


4

Looks like the green eye is leaking a tiny amount of electrolyte and the liquid layer on the battery collects dust. (Those green indicators are almost pointless, but they probably sell the batteries better.) The leak is minor and probably won't affect the battery performance. It is, however, probably enough to cause accelerated corrosion of the battery ...


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