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22

Got a 1998 Toyota Camry that has an empty battery and am wondering what the best course of action is. Why is it empty? Is it empty because the battery is old and dying and won't hold capacity? Or is it empty because you yesterday forgot the lights on? The correct course of action depends on the reason for it being empty. If the battery is good but you just ...


8

It didn't damage your battery or the charging at all. Because: All batteries in automotive created for simultaneously charging and discharging otherwise your car will not have an alternator in the first place. Your charger (SMPS type or Transformer type) has an output diode to maintain the current flow in a single direction, so the current from your battery ...


7

If the battery is completely flat, then it will have been severely degraded in capacity. Lead acid batteries don’t hold their full charge after going completely flat, so it would be best to replace the battery and make sure this doesn’t happen again. However if you want to try to charge it, it will be less stressful for the battery to be slowly charged by a ...


4

You probably did no damage. Most chargers have built-in protection for excessive amperage drain. Courtesy lights do not draw very many amps and the battery probably was taking a charge. Turn off all the accessories and charge your battery according to the instructions per charger and you should be good to go.


4

When the battery goes through charge/discharge cycles, the chemical composition of the internal plates changes, and they have different volumes. Eventually the swelling/shrinking will cause little cracks which will eventually connect and allow little fragments of plate material to fall to the bottom of the battery. When the pile of junk at the bottom grows ...


4

Is it pausible that a defective starter stopped my car? For most modern day vehicles, no. There are two reasons I state this. First, since the starter started the engine and it was running just fine, I'm going to have to assume it did its job, then retracted as it was supposed to. Even if it hadn't of retracted, the starter has a one way clutch on it, which,...


3

Is this behavior normal, or should I change the battery? No, it's not normal. From your description, you had two accessories turned on: radio, and ventilation fan (in a non-electric car, the heat comes from the engine, so if the engine is off, you don't literally have the heat on, though you can still extract what heat remains in the ventilation system's ...


3

Yes, obviously, otherwise how would you measure the charging voltage. The most likely error was having the multimeter leads connected to the current measuring terminals on the multimeter, when they should be connected to the voltage measuring terminals on the multimeter. Make sure the leads are corrected to the correct terminals and select the desired range -...


3

If he has a classic car with a positive ground (as opposed to almost all if not all modern cars that have a negative ground) then there is no danger and that is the proper terminal to disconnect. On the other hand, if his car has a negative ground this can be dangerous. The danger is present while disconnecting and reconnecting the battery. If while ...


3

A better solution is to fix these two problems and correct a few other common faults. Use a voltmeter or a test light to confirm if the switch is receiving and outputing 12 volt power. Then go to the bulb and see if it is receiving power. Even with power, the bulb would not work if the ground side is poor, or the bulb is open circuit. Also, look for ...


3

The "classic" warning light was connected between battery positive and the alternator output. This would then exhibit various states of illumination, which with experience, would tell one what was wrong without having to do all the tests stated in the workshop manual. So, if the light was on solid bright then the alternator was not charging and ...


3

You have it backwards, battery insulators are used to protect batteries from excess engine heat rather than protect them from cold, as extreme heat is worse for batteries than cold. Car batteries have no heat source, so an insulating blanket is only going to slow heat loss, a car battery sitting overnight will still reach ambient air temperature.


3

The easiest, most sure way to get this out would be by welding a nut onto the end of the bolt. This will do two things for you. First, it will give you something to turn with as when the nut is welded to the bolt, it will become just like it was (for the most part) when the original head of the bolt was present. Secondly, during the welding process, what is ...


3

No, these systems do not consume energy when activated. While there are several different designs, all are based on a motorized actuator that engages the brake. So it only is "on" for the short time it takes to push the brake shoes or pads into position. Then it's on again for the time it takes to move them away.


2

This ended up being a bad negative terminal connected to the battery. The vibration at engine start was just enough to disrupt the connection. When I jumped the car, the clamp secured the terminal and the connection -- and, of course, the extra juice helped too. I confirmed at the dealership (don't judge) that the alternator and starter are fine. Make sure ...


2

If driving doesn’t recharge a battery is there any point putting it on a charger? Maybe The alternator on your car will typically output a comparatively large current when it's recharging a battery and a battery in good condition can take it, and recharge quickly. This means a car used for frequent short journeys such as postal worker, door to door ...


2

Many years ago I had a similar problem, it turned out to be the boot light was staying on causing a small current drain. A very helpful garage mechanic climbed in the boot to find it.


2

Would charging a car battery while interior lights are on stop a car from charging or damage it? It depends. A filament lamp is essentially a resistor, and the interior light in your car is probably 5 watts. When driven by 12v it will consume about 0.42 amps, or when in a system that is more like 14v (i.e. when it's being charged) 0.36A. This applies for ...


2

Your car is equipped with both an immobilizer and a theft deterrent alarm (the beep beep one). Just the theft alarm beeping WILL NOT prevent starting, only the immobilizer does that. (Assuming this is the stock alarm and not aftermarket.) To disable beep beep alarm you must either cycle the key in a door lock or use the keyless entry buttons on a programmed ...


2

I suspect the sequence of events is the following: The bike has developed some non-battery-related fault which prevents it from starting but doesn't prevent the starter motor from running. You tried to start the bike with a good battery for 30 seconds. The current it takes to rotate the starter motor is very high. That current over 30 seconds heats all ...


2

No, you will need to top up the liquid level to above the plates. I suggest that you check the ph of the existing liquid so it can be matched. A good battery shop can mix the acid / water to that level - so can you if you have the acid of sufficient strength.


2

In trying to turn the extractor to remove the damaged bolt, you are applying torque to the extractor using a tool. The amount of torque you can apply is limited by your strength and the length of the tool's lever arm - that is, the distance between your hand on the tool and the axis of the bolt. To increase torque, and hopefully remove the damaged bolt, make ...


2

It's possible that the new battery is simply defective - like anything it's possible to buy a duff one. That said it could also just need a decent charge and I'm not sure a 20 min drive is going to be enough, the fact that it went up at all is a good indicator that the battery is ast least taking a charge. If you have a proper battery charger at home I'd ...


2

The technique for jump starting a vehicle depends on the diameter and length of the copper wires you use as jump leads. Your starter motor needs a lot of current to make it work, so it needs very thick wires to carry the current. If you look at the wires that go from the battery to the starter motor you will notice that they are very thick and they only ...


2

You could possibly jump start it, but without the positive battery post hooked up it will cause you two possible issues. Without it hooked up, you won't have the battery to provide the 12v buffering the rest of the electronic components need. This will most likely lead to failure of the electronics to include the alternator. You'll run the risk of the loose ...


2

Leaving a new battery unused for 3 months has probably killed it. Most "new" batteries come with sufficient charge to start the car straight away and you are expected to effectively fully charge them with subsequent use. As you left it for 3 months then the car ran all its normal things - clock, alarm etc and this continued to discharge the battery....


1

The relay starter is responsible for the starter motor and/or solenoid.The only other part would be the ignition switch .So try to test the starter relay(you should hear a click at the electrical relay box when cranking ,if you dont then you need to replace it ,otherwise test the continuity between ignition switch poles.


1

Your max charging rate of your battery is dependent on its Amp hour rating , its is usually round 1% of your CCA, so 620CCA is 6Amps. Note that different chemistries of batteries have different voltages for charging (Lead or Calcium lead (Low maintenance)) or gel based batteries .If your using the Amp Hour approach it is generally 30% of its Amp hour ...


1

Sure, a booster can work faster than a jump and be enough to start the engine. Just how fast depends on the amperage of the booster, the capacity (cold cranking amps) of your battery, how extinguished your battery is, and any shorts in your car's electrical system. By the way, even though it's a relatively new battery, be sure you've checked the water level....


1

Get some 12-gauge copper wire and strip off several inches of the insulation. Wrap the copper strands around the shank of the switch to increase its diameter. Bolt on your existing negative battery cable.


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