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7

All batteries last about the same amount of time, given the same climate and average use. I'm betting the dealership uses a large battery warranty to lure you in to other services, like a "loss leader". It's also common with free oil changes when you buy a car at a dealership. They lose money on the oil change but plan on you buying other stuff at a premium.


5

They may make 100-months guaranteed batteries with higher real capacity than 60-months ones. Higher capacity means that harmful events like overcurrent or deep discharge are less likely to happen, and that a battery still works fine after losing some of its original capacity, because the remaining capacity is still enough to reliably start the car. I would ...


2

The people in the sales/advertising department decide what will sell best. Long ago, the advertising people at Amoco picked some random long life number. To maintain company reputation , about any battery was replaced if a customer complained. When batteries failed and warrentee costs went up , some manager decided that some objective testing should be done, ...


2

Don't mistake the length of a battery's warranty with how long a battery will 'last' - it's just a warranty, not a guarantee of performance. So here's how it works: you buy a battery for $100 with a 60 month warranty. In 30 months, it dies. You go back to where you purchased the battery, and you will pay $50 for a new battery - that's called a '...


1

It's common to think of equipment failures as a linear equation where failure rate increases over time. This is not aligned with reality, however. A common way to model failure rates is the use of the 'bathtub curve' My personal experience with batter failures has been with 2 Hondas. One went more than 6 years (72 months) and the other lasted over 12 (...


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