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28

The main reason those would be sticking out of your battery post/terminal is because the terminal clamp has become too stretched. Someone put the copper wire in there to take up the slack of the clamp. Without them you'd lose connection and the battery would not provide the power to get the car started as well as the system having the ability to charge the ...


6

You may just have a bad connection on the battery posts. This would account for the sudden loss of power and also explain why everything powered up once the jump leads were added. Try disconnecting the battery connections and cleaning the connectors and battery post with some sand paper or wire wool, then reconnect. The reason why the car would not start ...


4

I've heard that AGM is "the best" and that LiPo is "even better" but "much more expensive". However, a standard maintenance-free battery is 30-50€, a LiFePo4 is 40-90€, AGM is >150€. I haven't seen standard LiPo in this size for sale, not through the usual suspects. If by LiPo you mean LiFePO4, then yes, in general lithium ion batteries, when properly used, ...


4

The test you are doing is not valid and shows you nothing really. For a start, you have not got it wired in parallel, you have got it wired in series. You would usually wire a voltmeter in parallel to measure voltage. You are therefore measuring the battery voltage with some voltage dropped across whatever is turned on in the car at that moment. In a ...


4

Sounds like your battery terminal connectors are stretched to the point that they are loose even when the bolt is fully tightened. Best fix would be to replace them with new connectors. Alternatively you could add a thin shim of metal between the post and the connector. Since the metal lead (battery post) has a high thermal expansion coefficient, my guess ...


3

I think your battery is okay. You are getting 12.7 volts after driving, which means that it is fully charged. It's the charge after sitting a few days that concerns me, 12.2 volts is generally considered 50% charge, 12.0 is 25% charge, so after a few days your battery is dropping below 50% charge. That's actually fairly normal as modern cars have battery ...


3

The other answer could be that in the past someone connected an extra wire to feed some add-on device in a very poor manner. Instead of getting a ring connector crimped onto the wire or tapping into a connector on a fusebox they could 'simply' have stripped the end of the wire. loosened the clamp and stuffed the wire between the post and the clamp. And then ...


2

The voltage readings sound fairly normal to me. Also, since you don't get fluctuating voltages depending on RPM, I would suspect the voltage regulator is also good. I would check elsewhere. Electrical short maybe, or failing electric steering box, or ECU?


2

It depends on the type of jump starter you have. If your jump starter is using a lead acid battery then this is likely fine but you should refer to the manual. If you’re using a li-ion jump starter then it will contain diodes to prevent current flowing back in to the li-ion battery as they will get damaged and explode from the charge off of an alternator. ...


2

Don't just idle the car, unless your owner's manual says that's alright (it probably does not). Go ahead and drive it somewhere; anywhere; doesn't need to be far. This will also clear out the engine of deposits that will accumulate if you merely idle it. Turn off all engine devices and accessories, including A/C, blower, wipers, headlights, seat heaters ...


2

My car is inactive for months at a time. I started it up and just left it running idle for 30 minutes. Alternator at idle does not produce maximum power. However, your battery is not typically charged at maximum power. Leave all the electrical accessories off (especially heated steering wheel, seats, windows etc), lights too if you can, so you will save 10 ...


2

Looks like it's one of these: https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NBP6535 Napa Type 35, 550 CCA wet cell battery If it was an AGM 35 it would be 640 CCA: https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NBP983585 - Not sure on the months thing, possibly an indicator it has a 12 month warranty as standard - NAPA warrant their batteries differently according to the type: ...


2

Yes. A good grounded metal part will connect to the negative of your hidden battery and is pretty much the same thing.


2

Lithium batteries are generally the best for power density, cycle life, cold performance, etc. I have some LiFePO4 cells that can candle 25C, while lead acid is typically rated for 1-2C continuous and maybe 5C max/cranking. This means an 8AH can deliver 40A for a few seconds, but the same size LiFePO4 can deliver 200A continuous. LiPo (RC batteries) may ...


2

I switched my '94 Suzuki Katana to LiFePo4 battery a few years ago. It cost a fair amount to get a quality one (and I opted to add-on the special charger which I've never even had to use). Provides lots of cranking power in the cold even when sitting for months. It has worked out well for me, but the manufacturers to have specific charging requirements, ...


1

While an AGM battery can better handle deep discharges, it only recovers properly if the vehicle's charging system was designed for an AGM battery. If yours came with a flooded lead acid battery, I doubt an AGM battery will solve your problem. Rather than spend the money for an AGM, just make sure you drive yours at least once every two weeks for minimum 20-...


1

The battery keeps constantly freezing/breaking due to it not being charged enough so I wanted to replace it with an AGM battery to get some more life out of it. I see several problems in that plan. Firstly, if the battery is not charged enough, the AGM battery will freeze too. It uses exactly the same kind of electrolyte than a flooded battery, but the ...


1

I'm reading 11.5 volts DC on the second screen. Your black lead is plugged into the ground (DC-) and the red lead is connected to 15V+. If you were measuring AC volts, the black lead would go one spot to the left in the AC V jack. Because it is connected to the 15V jack, you read the bottom scale from 0 to 15V, which is graduated in half-volt markings. Ten ...


1

I've done this before and it should be ok, depends on condition of battery and alternator, if you have a volt meter you could check the alternator is supplying between 13.6 and 14.4 volts. If you just leave it sitting for months at a time, I would move the car back and forth a little to make sure the brakes don't seize, and before switching it off, running ...


1

Impossible to say without knowing exactly how many amps those four accessories draw, and also remember that you need to have sufficient juice left in the battery to crank the engine if you're planning on starting the car again without jumping... But just for fun, let's say your draw is something like this: radio: 2 A blower fan: 4 A dome light: 500 mA one ...


1

30 amp rating is the capacity of the relay, take it past that rating and it burns up, go for the dead mans switch or a commercial battery Isolator, example here Generally you want the amp rating slightly higher than the max output of the alternator. Another source


1

No you can not. These small portable jump starters have a different type of battery than what your car has. you must use the included charger to recharge your jump starter. leaving it connected may actually damage the jump charger as they are not designed to be charged fast, the way your car battery is.


1

Can you recharge jump starter by connecting to battery You can, even at idle the alternator will raise the vehicle system voltage, causing the battery to charge, and the jump starter connected to it. This model has a lead-acid battery that will tolerate a fair rate of charging - obviously it's aimed solely at cranking duty, so they're more optimized for ...


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