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6

If you do a search for a 78DT battery as on the label on your battery, you will find that it is a dual terminal battery. It has 4 poles, but one of the top ones in your photo has a cap on it. If the cables on your vehicle will reach to the top poles of the existing battery, then you should be able to replace it with a ‘normal’ 2 pole battery with suitable ...


5

In a word: Absolutely The lack of material means a lack of electron flow. You won't get the proper charge of the battery, the right amount of power out of it come starting time, nor the full buffering effect a battery provides to the electrical system. It is a lose/lose/lose situation here. Replace it. It doesn't have to be exactly the same type. In fact, I'...


2

My favorite is adding a "custom" shim...i.e. pounding a nail in there so it'll tighten up:


2

Don't rule out the alternator! If the car is running, and the lights go dim, it means that you are not getting the power you need, which comes from the alternator. Many of the VW alternators from the 2000's had overrunning clutches on them. IMO, this just created another failure point. So much so that every alternator I have replaced (more than 20 on the ...


2

The article does note the first point - Regardless of the year, make or model of vehicle NEVER disconnect the car battery while the engine is running or the ignition key is on. The alternator has a certain amount of energy in its magnetics, and even though the regulator will switch off when the output voltage rises, there needs to be a path for that ...


2

Answers to your 3 questions: 1) No, there is no such "magical" device. If there were, everyone else would know about it too. When a battery is past the end of its service life there is no process to revive it. 2) Moot question in light of the first question. 3) I'm going to speculate that the initial test was faulty. The dealer likely charged the ...


1

No magical devices to bring a battery back to life.... except water if the level in low. Based on my experiences with dealers, a crooked service tech told her a good battery needed to be replaced. During the visits later on, you got an honest tech.


1

With older cars, the only likely key-off drain would be the clock, and maybe feed to the radio for maintaining presets, which won't add up to anything significant, but the battery itself has a self-discharge rate, and for a period of several months or more, I'd be either removing the battery and storing where it could be periodically checked and recharged, ...


1

Check things like the glove box light etc... But even a coil voltmeter can be used to detect a drain - connect it between the battery terminal and the battery cable and it will show voltage. Then disconnect or remove every fuse in turn until the drain stops ie the voltmeter goes to zero. You have then located the circuit that is at fault. Next break the ...


1

Your battery should be around 12V with the engine off (11V upwards usually still works). With the engine running, a test at the battery should show 13.5-14V. My guess would be that your battery is dead - you'll need a new one. Once you get it in, drive to a car spares store and have them test the battery and alternator. I'm amazed that the car did anything ...


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