5

I have often heard this term as well, but have never known the technical reasons or the actual root cause of what is known as a "surface charge". To figure it out, I took a gander at a website called the "Battery University". They state the following about a surface charge: Lead acid batteries are sluggish and cannot convert lead sulfate to lead and lead ...


3

The voltage readings sound fairly normal to me. Also, since you don't get fluctuating voltages depending on RPM, I would suspect the voltage regulator is also good. I would check elsewhere. Electrical short maybe, or failing electric steering box, or ECU?


2

While the answer by wilkvolk is accurate for recharging a battery, I'm pretty sure you won't need to go through all of that to do what you need it to do. If the battery is hooked up to your vehicle and is being recharged by your on board charging system (ie: alternator), and the on board charging system is functioning correctly, you shouldn't have to worry ...


2

No, you will need to top up the liquid level to above the plates. I suggest that you check the ph of the existing liquid so it can be matched. A good battery shop can mix the acid / water to that level - so can you if you have the acid of sufficient strength.


1

An AGM battery is a lead acid battery, it's best to not go too far down the rabbit hole of comparing a regular liquid electrolyte battery to AGM, there's no practical difference when you are measuring voltage/state of charge. There is tons of misinformation floating around the web once you start reading about AGM's. Measuring the voltage of a battery only ...


1

Step 1 Wear protective gloves and goggles before you rebuild the cell structure of your 12- volt battery. You need to access the cell reservoirs that contain highly toxic sulfuric acid that immediately burns on contact with skin. Step 2 Place your 12-volt lead-acid battery in a battery tray on a stable work surface. Remove the six battery cell caps on top of ...


1

If the battery will start the car and is over (or in the neighborhood of) 12.5vdc, I doubt you have anything to worry about. The great thing about most battery manufacturers is, their warranty usually covers for at least three years. This means, if the battery does fail you, you shouldn't have a problem getting it replaced. Really, what I'd do with it is, ...


1

Automotive batteries are designed for infrequent, brief high amp output with minimal parasitic load. Regular use as a power supply battery providing sustained low amp load will lead to a reduced service life of the battery. A better solution is an isolation circuit and a second, power supply type battery such as a marine or wheelchair battery. The voltage ...


1

Car batteries only last a certain length of time - average is about 5-6 years although it will depend on the climate and the type of use the car gets. What the AA are telling you is that your battery is getting to the end of it's life - they fully charged it, but it won't keep that charge as well as it should do, especially in cold weather. It's probably, ...


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