9

Why don't you connect it to the battery directly? Do you know, that mechanical contact with metal springs inside lighter plugs is not very reliable? It has relatively big resistance and will be heating during flow of such high current for a relatively long time. What can potentially result in melting surrounded plastic panels and even cause fire if you ...


7

On my car, the lighter (power) outlet is switched with the ignition, so it is not directly connected to the battery, so you would not be able to charge the battery through that connector if the ignition is off (and perhaps not if the ignition is on.) Perhaps, on very old cars, the lighter outlet was powered at all times, so could possibly be used to charge ...


5

You shouldn't be shopping for a battery charger but for a power supply. A properly designed battery charger will have protection circuits that stop it frying batteries (and on a bad day, starting fires) just because the user set it to the highest charge rate. That will most likely make it useless for electrolysis. On the other hand, if you tell an ...


5

If the outlet is directly connected to the battery then it should be possible. Make sure to connect the solar panel through a charge controller configured for the chemistry of you car battery, so the charging will stop as soon as the battery is full. This protects the battery and the cars electronics. Adding another load should be no problem, there is just ...


4

There's a lot in your question, so let's look at it in parts: My vehicle's cigarette lighter outlet is limited to 10 amps output. If charging were limited to less than 10 amps, would solar panel -> charge controller -> cigarette lighter outlet work for charging a car battery. Technically, yes. Realistically: not a great idea. Generally speaking, ...


4

Given how complicated this seems from both posts, I would suggest that you fit a known good battery and run the complete set of tests on the charging system. I would include the tests for voltage drop across all the cables just to make sure. These tests are usually given in the workshop manual, but basically involve having all heavy loads on (lights, heater,...


2

Answers to your 3 questions: 1) No, there is no such "magical" device. If there were, everyone else would know about it too. When a battery is past the end of its service life there is no process to revive it. 2) Moot question in light of the first question. 3) I'm going to speculate that the initial test was faulty. The dealer likely charged the ...


2

Looks like it's one of these: https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NBP6535 Napa Type 35, 550 CCA wet cell battery If it was an AGM 35 it would be 640 CCA: https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NBP983585 - Not sure on the months thing, possibly an indicator it has a 12 month warranty as standard - NAPA warrant their batteries differently according to the type: ...


1

A 100Ah battery will likely have a lower internal resistance than a 65Ah battery. That will mean that the 100Ah batter will try to draw more current when charging than the 65Ah battery. A good quality charger should be able to limit its maximum current to say for example 6A without any harm to itself or the battery. In that case it will take almost twice ...


1

No magical devices to bring a battery back to life.... except water if the level in low. Based on my experiences with dealers, a crooked service tech told her a good battery needed to be replaced. During the visits later on, you got an honest tech.


1

Any auto battery used monthly and competently charged in-between should last 4-8 years depending on conditions. This is halfway between a daily automotive use (where that is true) and less-than-once-yearly emergency-power use (where that is also true). If the technology is lead-acid, age in years will be the single most important factor, and there will ...


1

You can perform maintenance or "float" charges with underpowered battery chargers, but performing bulk charges (i.e. if the battery is completely drained) can burn out microcontroller in the smaller-powered "smart" chargers, or worse, cause the release of Hydrogen gas from the battery. In summary, you CAN charge it with a lower powered battery charger, but ...


1

It occurred to me that good test setups are close to operating conditions, so an evaluation better than battery trials would be electrolysis itself. Before that occurred to me, I drained my core-battery by hooking it up to a spare old fashion head light. When the light dimmed to almost nothing, I figured it was really low. I scheduled a revisit, and ...


1

I use a wall-wart for electrolysis - 20V at 2Amps... works fine. Testing that charger properly may take much more gear than you have, seeing it work on a battery probably meant it was fine. But it may have control circuitry that will prevent it working to do your electrolysis...


1

If you take the figure stated on the battery (ie 10AH) and divide it by the 3 (3A of the charger) then that will give you a reasonable time in hours. But it does depend on how discharged the battery is initially. A battery that is dad flat will take a while to start charging and take longer overall, if that is, it will recharge. A battery that is half ...


1

The battery was bad. It continued to exhibit weird behavior I've never seen from a battery before. After getting it to charge once, it consistently charged to proper voltage using the 15 amp dedicated AC charger, and provided good current for cranking, but seemed to have really low capacity. After a couple hours with minimal draw, it would be back down to ...


1

That battery needs to be replaced. Even if it were fully charged, the current should be higher causing gassing.


1

Make certain you turn the headlights on for two minutes after "recharging" and before you take a voltage reading. The 12.7 you see immediately after engine shutdown may represent a "surface charge" created by tiny bubbles on the plates due to charging. It's a phantom voltage, and doesn't really represent the state-of-charge (SOC) of the battery. Once the ...


1

As Solar Mike says, you need to look at split-charge relay systems for this - these are specially designed to protect both batteries by only connecting them when the inputs are operating and the voltages are appropriate, so that you don't end up draining the vehicle battery when using the domestic one or vice-versa. To use both the solar system and the ...


1

I'm driving a 2015 LEAF in S (base) trim. It has a CHAdeMO port and 6.6kW L2 charging. The 2011 and 2012 LEAFs (like David B's) all had 3.3kW L2 charging, CHAdeMO or not. However, starting in 2013, CHAdeMO was an option on the S trim, standard on the SV and SL trim. And if you have CHAdeMO, you have 6.6kW L2.


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