Hot answers tagged

6

Yes, the passenger seat belt warning chime and the passenger present systems are linked. I can't speak about Opel directly, I'm familiar with Mazda and Honda. The way the passenger present systems works, is by using a weight sensor in the seat. The weight sensor senses below 20 kilos and above 40 kilos. If something is on the seat that is below 20 kilos ...


5

The inside band is not an issue. There is space between where the brake rides on the rotor (the shiny part) and the hat (the hub area). There has to be space here to allow the rotor to rotate independently of the brake pad and caliper. The outside band may be more problematic. On most disk brake setups I've looked at, there will be a small band, usually ...


5

Essentially you have put 10 milliliters of oil in your gastank I have done this before with more oil than that on accident into my truck. My solution was to fill the tank to the top and dilute it as much as possible. This worked fine for me and I had no ill effects that I am aware of. The truck passed emissions after that and I have had no maintenance ...


5

The LCD panel is failing internally and will need replacing with another one. There is no way to repair the panel itself.


4

The car will be fine, that's just the noise the starter motor/solenoid makes when the battery is flat. The solenoid switches on the motor and engages the motor's gear with the flywheel, allowing it to turn the engine. There is a strong spring which pushes the solenoid back to its resting position after use. When the battery is very low it can't supply ...


4

I just did this last weekend. It is an easy job! The consensus on must of the Vauxhall/Opel forums is not to try and poke anything into the hole, you'll just ram the blockage further inside the nozzle. Here are the steps... Unclip the "strings" which hold the parcelshelf in place Unscrew the plastic ball joints which those string were clipped to Unclip the ...


4

I don't know that particular car well, but maybe a vacuum leak? Perhaps it's at the intake manifold, and worsening as the parts warm up, expand, and mating surfaces change shape?


4

This is an opinion question, so you may get varied answers. This is my opinion. In my experience, I have found it is always best to start with the simple and work toward the difficult. In your case, I would start with the wastegate before going to the expense and difficulty of changing the turbo itself.


4

It really depends on which part is sticking. If I've reconnoitered your turbo correctly, it has a built in wastegate. If it's the wastegate which is sticking and not the actuator, then you're wasting money by replacing the actuator (the turbo replacements I've seen for your engine come with a new actuator). You need to verify which part is at fault, ...


3

Could be a few things.. If you or a friend can do the basic testing. Try the following... Firstly.. Check your battery terminals are making good contact with the battery, and that they are tightened up securely. Also check the connections on the back of the starter motor are secure.. Whilst you're there check the starter motors mounting bolts are tight ...


3

I'm having trouble seeing the "oil event" and the "limp mode" as being related. When you added the oil, it was – as @DucatiKiller pointed out – only about 10 ml. This went into about 48 liters of fuel. First, it would take a long time for that amount of oil to even run through the engine, so I think it would be highly unlikely that you'd notice a problem ...


3

Check the receipt from the garage to ensure it really was unleaded petrol that you purchased.


3

Do you have a Haynes manual or similar for the car? They usually describe how to remove the various bits of trim... Before trying to remove the trim, have you tried cleaning the nozzle out with the tip of a needle or a fine bit of wire? The bottom photo shows the trim to be in four parts - the window surround (two parts), the lower panel and the lock ...


3

it turned out that the car was tuned and it had some extra electronic that was connected to the computer and the fuel pump. This wasn't a native part of the car and it was hidden. We founded after expecting the electric installation and searching for problems there. After removing it there are no problems and the car runs great. Ill try to post pictures from ...


3

Diesel not have idle control valve as there is no concept of throttling and therefore no throttle pressure sensor One of the possibility could be a bad Acceleration pedal sensor which can give a wrong input to ECU.


3

Has it got the clutchless compressor or the clutch equipped one (have a look in the engine bay and tell me if there's a wire coming from the compressor's pulley or a wire coming from the compressor's back)? If yours is the clutch equipped one first check if the front part of the pulley (the clutch hub) is rotating when AC is on. If not, bring out a ...


3

It is warning you to read the manual before you open it. I assume that is is for the auto transmission that it is fitted to the car. It looks like you lift the black handle 90 degrees to release the locking mechanism then withdraw the dipstick, but only under the conditions specified for that transmission.


3

I found the issue. A small vacuum hose that goes from the vacuum pump to the turbine (waste gate, I assume) was disconnected during the emissions test and just left hanging. It's in a difficult-to-see spot underneath a bracket located between the engine and the battery. The hose is dirty and grimy, while the end of it was shiny and clean. It fits snugly and ...


2

In most cars with automatic transmission, if not all, it is normal to hear a "clicking" sound from underneath the gear selector. Pressing the brake pedal activates the brake switch, which disengages the park lock solenoid to allow the selector to move out of P. The "click" sound is emitted when the parking lock is released.


2

I would try using a multimeter that can measure DC current to see which circuits are drawing power with the ignition off. The radio should draw some, and the alarm (if your car has one) and whatever circuit handles the remote door locks, but other than that there shouldn't be anything drawing any power. Make sure there aren't any lights or anything that aren'...


2

The engine size was not provided. This suggestion is for the 2.2 litre engine. The water pump on the 2.2 litre engine is driven by the timing chain. If it is leaking from the front seal this will drip water into the sump oil. If the water is dripping onto the ground it is probably the "O" rings on the pipe that cross between the water pump and the ...


2

The part number that solved my problem is 24405911. It is known as Oil Pump front main gasket. When one will replace it it will remove the timing belt, thus consider replace them together.


2

Are you sure you've not put unleaded into a diesel? Was the vehicle almost out of fuel when you topped up. If so it could be an air lock somewhere in the fuel system. Also perhaps bad fuel from the garage, it does happen.


2

The issue is either the sender (most likely), the gauge, or the wiring between them. Some vehicles have a separate sender for the gauge. The usual way to test the sender is to measure the resistance when the engine is cold and when the engine is hot. For 1 pin senders, measure between the output and ground. For 2 pin sensors, measure between the 2 pins.


2

There shouldn't be "heavy sucking of air into the TB" when the hose is disconnected unless your air filter is totally blocked. Try removing your air filter and retest. However, excessive crankcase pressure can cause oil to be pushed out of the breather and into the throttle body. This can be caused by worn rings or worn valves, oil sloshing (hard cornering), ...


2

It is a tank filter most likely and needs changing every 40k, see here : http://www.vauxhallownersnetwork.co.uk/index.php?threads/astra-1-6vvt-petrol-fuel-filter-location.278296/ As for adding a filter, yes you can, but make sure it and the fittings will be rated for the pressure in the supply line.


2

The reason they have coolant running through the throttle body is to prevent frosting in cold weather. If you live in a warm weather area, you can bypass this in most cases. One of the problems with running coolant through the throttle body is it actually makes the throttle body hot once the engine has warmed up.


2

As engine speed increases, the flaps are gradually opened until, at around 2,000 rpm, they are parallel to the airflow and present virtually no resistance. Their purpose is to ensure that the air entering the cylinder is sufficiently turbulent for good fuel-air mixing even at low engine speeds. This aids in reducing certain toxic emissions and may also ...


2

The most likely cause of that is a failed switch, in this case failing in the 'on' position. You can check this by disconnecting the wiring from the switch (which will either be on the gearbox or near the gear lever) and checking that the lights don't come on. Assuming this is the case, a new switch will be cheap, although depending on it's position it may ...


2

Changing compressor is pretty easy on your car, however you have to go and fill it at some car shop. Your compressor is on the top of alternator, so it's easy to access and take off. If I remember correctly 3 bolts are holding it then disconnect the hoses and you are good to go.


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