21

Based on the pictures that you provided, there are three things that are clearly damaged right off the bat. Your lower control arm is broken. This is the mechanism that houses your lower ball joint and provides upright stability to the wheel. With it broken, the wheel "folds" under the car as there is nothing holding the bottom of the wheel in place. ...


17

I agree with resident_heretic - DO NOT drive the car again until it has been properly repaired. It sounds like you have multiple bent or broken suspension parts, and if the crash was bad enough to have done that much, there is a high chance the frame could be bent too (rendering the car irreparable) - get it properly checked by a competent mechanic to make ...


16

First of all, anyone who is off-roading knows the inevitability of a roll over. It happens; you deal with it. If you have an expectation of never rolling over or never scratching the paint, then keep your vehicle on-road with the rest of the highway queens. Once any trail damage occurs, you'll have dents. Rolling a vehicle over may just cause your rig to be ...


13

I'd be asking if the car was put on a chassis rig when it was repaired. If it's even had just one day on a rig, it was clearly enough of an impact that made the assessor/repairer think it might be a write-off. If it wasn't put on a chassis rig, the next thing to look at are signs of welding along the forward chassis, particularly radiator support and crash ...


12

Based on what I could understand of your description. I am surprised that that the vehicle would move let alone be driveable. Despite what your stepfather said I would strongly advise against driving anywhere until it is fixed. You would putting your life at risk in doing so. Sounds like multiple issues- linkages,tie rods, steering rack and pinon unit, ...


12

Everyone else has said it already, but to reiterate: DO NOT DRIVE THIS CAR ON PUBLIC ROADS! This car is a danger to yourself, and everyone who shares the road with you. Continuing to drive this car is irresponsible, and more than likely illegal depending on your jurisdiction. I imagine the damage is fairly obvious whether stopped or moving, and any ...


11

Tool list: Several large/long tow straps (30ft each or longer recommended) Portable electric winch and battery, in case your buddy is not there to use his winch mounted on the front bumper. Some 4"x4" wood posts from the lumber store, different lengths up to 8 feet, they make good prying instruments, longer the better. Large Come along or two if you dont ...


9

You said "the dealer tells me that the car was likely rebuilt." The dealer should know for a fact that the car was rebuilt and issued a salvaged title, if not, walk away. On top of that, if the seller is slow, hesitant, or unwilling to comply with any of your requests for information about, or access to the vehicle, walk away. The most common damage in deer ...


6

You say the control arm is bent. Replace the arm, get it all checked by a professional, and get the wheels aligned using a proper laser alignment rig. As we said in your last question, DO NOT DRIVE THE CAR UNTIL IT IS ALL FIXED - IT IS DANGEROUS AND YOU WILL BE CRIMINALLY LIABLE FOR ANY CONSEQUENCES


6

Update, Dec 2016: Just this month, Michigan legalizes self-driving car testing on public roads, and GM is going to start testing. As things continue to move in this direction, the field will no doubt start to lend itself towards developed communications protocols. At the same time, also this month, the NHTSA is pushing to move forward with deployment of ...


6

Since you posted another question about an Aveo/Kalos i guess you are talking about that car. Some come with the holder, with the possibility to attach it to the door or somewhere close to the knee but it can end being in the way and usually is too far. I had a couple of bad accidents where the seatbelt locked and didn't slide anymore and I wouldn't have ...


5

All good answers but they focus on how to move vehicles and gear availale, without mentioning method. The recovery must have other things done first. Delegate these tasks to different people: Stabilise the situation - that means killing the engine, pull on the hand brake, put the gearbox in a gear, engage freewheel hubs, putting a rope/chain on and to ...


5

The number one rule, as always, is safety - and this means keeping people out of the way. Firstly make sure you have everyone out of, and clear of, the vehicle, especially anyone not directly involved in the recovery. Switch off the engine. Make sure all the kit you intend to use is in good condition, and rated for well over the vehicle's weight. Check ...


5

First of all check the body panels and items you can see under the bonnet, doing this before you go to the hassle of getting alignment checked can save you money as you might find something that makes the car beyond economical repair. Check the roof skin/panel, if its simply dented down due to the ground hitting it it can be replaced, but if it's warped due ...


4

I'm going to keep this away from being an opinion piece as those are off topic for this SE. So lets just look at some things to consider: Cost New parts will be more expensive, even from Rock Auto, because remember they have Rock auto too, they just tack on to that price when they sell it to you. Used parts may need repair of their own, especially since it ...


4

A scooter is quite rigid for its weight and size, and there shouldn't happen much more than some scratches, broken mirrors etc. There are just two issues I can think of: If the scooter fell hard on a brake lever, this could have damaged the lever itself or for example one of the gaskets inside, when it's a hydraulic brake. Obvious signs would be a brake ...


4

I may be crazy, but in the second picture it looks like either: You only have two lug nuts holding that wheel on Two of the lug nuts are so loose they are about to come off. It's hard to tell which. In either case, the broken suspension parts, the chunk missing from the wheel edge, plus the missing lug nuts, the car is downright dangerous this way. Really ...


4

Uneven bonnet gaps These are a dead giveaway of a bad repair job - also, check if the gap is too large or small for the car - try and get a photo from a similar angle to one existing to check. Also check door gaps, boot gaps, panel gaps for any misalignment. Check underneath Try and get under the car if you can - if you're mechanically minded you should ...


4

All depends on how badly they are bent and if they are structural or not. Some body shops can pull a bent frame back into shape if it's not too badly bent. This frame will be functional but almost certainly weaker than it was. You will need to check local laws as some places will not be happy about you driving a vehicle around with structural damage. ...


3

In addition to the other fine answers, you should inspect the crumple zones, which are most easily inspected by looking between the fender bolts under the hood. On most vehicles, you should see the factory ripples in the sheet metal. If that metal looks like it was ever deformed, painted, or replaced, then walk away from the car.


2

An autobody shop can make the critical measurements to specific suspension alignment points on the unibody, according to the OEM specification. The vehicle is "benched", usually on the pinch welds under the rockers, and then a pantograph and pointer system with accurate scales is used to measure cross-corner suspension mounting points and other critical ...


2

Check at least for the following: Paint color match and alignment of panels. Stand a short distance in front of the vehicle and look for uniformity between the left and right sides. Check for overspray (repainting) under the hood/fenders. If any overspray is visible, repairs were likely shoddy. On later model cars, look for a small VIN decal - under hood,...


2

You could attach a visor panel on your sun shade and place the life hammer there. Something like this MOLLE-compatible visor could work: The MOLLE attachments give you plenty of versatility, and its size allows you to attach more than just the hammer.


2

It's possible that the Eyesight system might be out of calibration after the accident. It's under warranty, so I'd take the car to the dealer for a checkup; they're going to know more than a body shop about what might affect your ABS system.


2

You are responsible for insuring your vehicle. Period. Full stop. It's in the bank's interest to make sure you insure your vehicle since it's their collateral on the loan they've given you. If that collateral should happen to suddenly be worthless from an accident, the bank wants to know that their loan will still be repaid. It's very likely that they had ...


2

As Nick C said: Get it checked by a professional. In this condition the car is not drivable and further driving will: Put you and others in danger Damage certain parts (especially the tires) of your car


2

The dent is right over the wheel well, just loosen or remove the wheel well plastics (maybe 2 or 3 screws), then use some padded vices or similar to bend/pop/coax out the dents. I think you'll have more flexibility working with it in this manner. There's only so much pulling can do without getting at the back side of the panel. After buffing out the ...


2

Toyota does not publicly acknowledge the existence of flight recorder type data logging. Access to any such data is not available on the Official approved Scan Tool. I have the OEM scanner and have looked for such data and have found no way to access it, if it exists. It is suspected that most OEM's do record such data but reserve it for their use and hide ...


2

Yes, modern vehicles do this. They can also activate the hazard lights in an emergency braking situation, so even before/no impact. I experienced this firsthand when attending a driving seminar where we practiced emergency braking, skidding etc. - where another attendee had a newer Mercedes, which kept blinking away at those exercises. In the future EU-...


2

Take it to a car lot that has an identical vehicle and compare. I did this once and was shocked at the difference between a wrecked and non wrecked. Also obviously drive it and see if it tracks good and has no vibrations. Nothing wrong with buying a wrecked car if the repairs are done right


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