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5

Fogging happens when there's a temperature differential between one side of the glass and the other. Most racecars are open - they remove the windows to save weight too, so the temperature inside the car is the same as the outside. As there's no difference in temperature there's usually no mechanism for fog to form in the first place. Still, the conditions ...


5

Vacuuming the system isn't a "do if you want to" ... it is a must do if you want the system to work. There are two reasons to vacuum the system before entering refrigerant. First, it gets all atmosphere out of the system. Atmosphere will not work as a refrigerant and will keep the system from working correctly. Secondly, you vacuum the system to ...


3

Checking the pg. 28 of service manual suggests that you don't need to add any oil for replacing the dryer itself - just the 1ml for the replacing the hose: Replacement parts Amount of oil replenishment Evaporator 114 ml (3.9 US fl oz, 4.0 Imp fl oz) Condenser 7 ml (0.24 US fl oz, 0.25 Imp fl oz) Hose 1 ml (0.03 US fl oz, 0.04 Imp fl oz) PS: While the ...


3

Fog on your windshield doesn't occur due to the difference between one side of the glass and the other, it's because of the dew point of the air. If the glass is below the dew point of the air it comes in contact with (whether inside or out), fog will occur on there unless there's no moisture in the air (which effectively lowers the dew point). You usually ...


2

The can top picture is a non-puncture can. The tap with a sharp point is the tap for puncture cans. The tap with a flat point is for non-puncture cans. They are very inexpensive.


2

Sounds like old mechanics lore to me. I've never experienced this personally and found that in nearly all cases, corrosion aside, that the bolts in question are easy enough to remove but the removal torque is always greater than the torque spec on installation. The pulley on either the A/C compressor or the crank pulley should not be moving with respect to ...


2

Basically, no ... there's really no correlation between how the turbocharger works or makes power versus how well the A/C cools the vehicle. It does take power to run the A/C compressor. It takes power to run the alternator or water pump as well. So, when the A/C is doing its thing, there is less power available to propel the vehicle. A/C compressors really ...


1

There is NO WAY this is the reason the bolt seems tighter upon trying to loosen it, and directly for the reasons jwh20 has stated. There is one more reason why it couldn't happen on most engines. Since almost every engine out there turns clockwise while it's running (yes, there are a few exceptions, like the Honda D17a series engines), the torque applied to ...


1

Usually it will be in the front footwell and you will recognise it as it usually has a grill. Stops paper etc being drawn in.


1

GM products are known for this issue. It can sometimes be prevented by making sure all the HVAC controls are in the off positions. If you wait patiently for 10 minutes in the vehicle after turning it off you can hear the doors return to the home position. Of course this only works if disconnecting the battery was planned. If the vehicle has some age (5 years ...


1

It's not usually a problem. The inside of most competition vehicles is pretty warm, so once you've cleared off any misting in the morning (using a cloth usually), it doesn't tend to fog up again. Saying that, we used to use either 'rain-x' or toothpaste rubbed on the inside of the screen to stop it misting on colder night rallies. AC certainly isn't ...


1

It depends. If the refrigerant was lost with a slow leak, then most of the oil may still be in the system ("most" because you would have lost some changing the components out). If the leak was larger, some oil may have escaped. Without fully draining and recharging the system, it's going to be a guess. That said, unless there's evidence of ...


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