Hot answers tagged

19

I really think that it's more of a naming convention issue but there is a marked difference between 4x4 and AWD. In 4x4 all the wheels are "guaranteed" power. Power is sent from the engine to the transfer case and then the transfer case sends it to the front axle and rear axle. The reason I put guaranteed in quotes is because there is such a thing as full ...


18

As has already been noted, anything rubber will have perished and will need replacing, as will all the fluids and any other normal perishable items (brakes, battery, filters etc). The brakes will have siezed on, and depending how dry the garage was, the interior may have mould and the bodyshell may have gone rusty... The biggest risk, however, is that the ...


16

First of all, anyone who is off-roading knows the inevitability of a roll over. It happens; you deal with it. If you have an expectation of never rolling over or never scratching the paint, then keep your vehicle on-road with the rest of the highway queens. Once any trail damage occurs, you'll have dents. Rolling a vehicle over may just cause your rig to be ...


12

No, it cannot. In fact, in the United States it is illegal for a tire shop to repair a tire which has side wall damage. The reason for this is because the integrity of the tire itself is compromised with side wall damage. Now, I'm not saying it could not be fixed per se (a simple patch could probably do it), but would you want to risk your safety or that of ...


11

One of the things the other answers neglected to mention and is probably the key point between AWD and 4x4 is that AWD transfer cases will almost always be a single speed differential. The 4x4 will almost always have 4-wheel high and 4-wheel low ranges and be selectable. This provides more torque if the driver deems the situation to need it. 4x4 may also ...


11

My first thoughts, given the car is question, would be to check to see if there is a performance version of the car which features four wheel drive. For road use, if you have over 300bhp going through the front wheels, things can get difficult. A friend of mind had a 320bhp Seat Leon Cupra (Front wheel drive) and sold it to buy an Audi S3 (same basic ...


11

Tool list: Several large/long tow straps (30ft each or longer recommended) Portable electric winch and battery, in case your buddy is not there to use his winch mounted on the front bumper. Some 4"x4" wood posts from the lumber store, different lengths up to 8 feet, they make good prying instruments, longer the better. Large Come along or two if you dont ...


8

The letters are standard: Park Reverse Neutral Drive Sport (or possibly Snow - thanks @Brian) Braking (usually for going down hills) None of these have anything to do with 4WD or 2WD selection. If your Daihatsu is the 4WD version, it is permanently 4WD - there is no selector on that spec of car. It was a specific Japanese edition. You have stated ...


8

One of the valves in the brake servo (booster) is stuck open. When you start the engine the vacuum produced by the engine (or a separate vacuum pump) is used to assist braking pressure from your foot. As you press the brake pedal, a valve in the servo opens to allow the vacuum to pull against the diaphragm in the servo to assist you. If a valve is stuck ...


8

On page 186 of the owners manual there are instructions that tell you what to do when this indicator blinks. Highlighted below: (highlight added for emphasis) Given that you've tried shifting to different modes several times, you may not know what mode it thinks it's shifting from. You may be able to simply go through all the possible sequences described ...


6

Pretty sure it's this one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Delica I guess it's the third generation of the Mitsubishi Delica, pre-facelift. Rougly from 1986 to 1994. Also the country where it's from narrows down the options, as they look a tad different from each other depending on the country.


6

Thoroughly flush the diff and transfer box - then refill with the correct type and amount of oil. To prevent this problem - extend the breathers to either inside the cabin or the roof line. This was a standard modification on Landrovers that went wading regularly. The issue is usually caused by the air cooling and shrinking when the hot gearbox gets ...


5

There is one other thing that can cause what you are describing. There is either a pilot bearing or a pilot bushing that supports the input shaft of the transmission. I don't know which, but if it is a bushing, it would make sense based on your description. If the borrowers slipped the clutch quite a bit and were in a position to use the clutch a lot, ...


5

Is it possible to bleed the clutch hydraulics? (I don't remember if the Jeep has that option off the top of my head.) If so, this is where I'd look first. If not, I believe you need to replace them. It seems as though the clutch is not quite letting go when you depress the pedal. The five seconds gives it enough time to spin down. The fact that you can drive ...


5

I would say that it is not a safe assumption. There are three main places where a wheel could be loose at, assuming the lug nuts are tight. Those are the wheel bearing(s), upper/lower ball joints, or at bushings at the base of the control arm. You might also be getting deflection out of your tie rod ends or steering rack (if equipped) as well. You could also ...


5

It matters, but how much it matters varies from vehicle to vehicle. TireRack has an article about this topic -> Matching Tires on Four-Wheel Drive and All-Wheel Drive Vehicles Here is the Manufacture Specific info from the end of the article: Here are recommendations from some of the manufactures that Tire Rack currently serves for matching the tires ...


5

I had the same problem, it was a vacuum line for me. I found the leak, fixed it and the light no longer blinks. So check out your vacuum line for leaks.


5

Before you start, I'd have a good read of the rules applying to it - I seem to remember that Germany is very strict on heavily modified cars, so you might well find there are restrictions on what you can do to it - modifying the monocoque (chassis/bodyshell) to allow the fitment of a propshaft and rear drive axle might well be restricted, or involve huge ...


5

The number one rule, as always, is safety - and this means keeping people out of the way. Firstly make sure you have everyone out of, and clear of, the vehicle, especially anyone not directly involved in the recovery. Switch off the engine. Make sure all the kit you intend to use is in good condition, and rated for well over the vehicle's weight. Check ...


5

All good answers but they focus on how to move vehicles and gear availale, without mentioning method. The recovery must have other things done first. Delegate these tasks to different people: Stabilise the situation - that means killing the engine, pull on the hand brake, put the gearbox in a gear, engage freewheel hubs, putting a rope/chain on and to ...


4

Check under the rear of the car you should be able to see the rear differential. it is the aluminium finned item between the rear wheels If you don't have on then you definitely don't have a quattro, you should also check the VIN to make sure. The driveshaft it self is kinda hard to see depending on the angle. If your car was sold to you as a quattro and ...


4

All Audi Qauttro's have a driveshaft that connects the front differential with the rear differential. Your car does not have 4wd if it does not have a driveshaft. In my country (Denmark) you can add the car to your profile at https://my.audi.com and add the VIN of the car. Then you can see all information about the car including factory installed options ...


4

To answer your question, it seems like you didn't buy a Quattro. You bought a FWD car, unless Audi invented some way of transferring power without a drive shaft :(. You might want to talk to the person you bought it from, and bring it to their attention.


4

I have my 1990 Toyota V6 3.0 extra cab running on the front two wheels only, I had the same thing happen. I was told, a friend of mine, drove a similar truck all the way from the desert into San Diego. I've been driving the truck all morning, the deal is, I have a "High" 4x4 and a "Low" 4x4, right now I have it engaged to be High 4x4, I am not using the ...


4

While this is not "scientific data", I did find some empirical data on the subject from this website. The author talks about his experience with the Honda Pilot and its VTM-4 system: Reading about VTM-4, the way I understood it to work was this... Under normal conditions, the VTM-4 system is FWD biased and transfers power/torque to the rear as needed....


4

4WD has the best traction in off road conditions, which is mainly what most larger vehicles are used for. As well as this, 4WD offers better fuel economy which is generally more favorable in a larger vehicle as these will already have a greater fuel consumption due to their added weight. You are correct about AWD being at least as good in conditions such as ...


4

Beyond what @cory says, once you get them hung on the chassis and the weight of the diff dangelling on them, the leaves will open up and you can squirt in some marine-grade grease. This will let the leaves rub against each other smoother. If you intend on disassembling the spring pack, then you can fit some PTFE-based plastic sheets between each leaf for ...


4

I added that picture for you. I am not sure if this is the same subaru AWD dual range transaxle your Forester has but it will do for this discussion. The image below shows the direction engine power takes when the collar selects the forward gear set or the rear gear. when the collar is moved towards the front of the trans, where the clutch should be, it ...


4

That's an unfortunate scenario. While it's not the end of the world to use 4wd on pavement in your case, you would want to keep the speed low, and avoid tight turns--turn off 4wd if you are going to be going fast or turning tight. But yeah, you are going to be wearing our parts of your drive train (I think transfer case in particular) using it like this. ...


4

My best guess would be an early 90's (1991 ??) Mitsubishi Delica.


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