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I've been dealing with an ongoing issue with my 2012 Renault Logan's radiator fan motor repeatedly failing. I purchased the car about 10 months ago, and everything was fine until the hot summer months hit (around 45°C/113°F). I noticed that the radiator fan tends to stay on for a short while even after I turn off the car. It seems like this might be by design, as there's a warning label under the hood about it.

When the fan died initially, mechanics fixed the issue by adjusting the cable and it worked for around a week. I also had a radiator leak around the same time, and they replaced the radiator. A week later, the fan failed again and it would work when they gave a knock to the motor, leading them to suggest replacing the fan motor.

Due to steep prices for genuine Renault parts and no warranty, they installed a Chinese replacement which died in a week. After hunting for a while, I found an original fan assembly at a scrapyard, but the connector had been damaged from previous attempts at fixing it and they had to do some soldering to connect it this time. This replacement failed in about 3 weeks. Not sure if this is important but a few times the fan died was when I turned the car off and back on almost immediately.

Before giving up, I'd like to know if there might be an underlying issue causing these repeated fan failures. Is there something the garages might be missing? Any advice or similar experiences would be greatly appreciated.

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  • I got it checked up and the fan wasn't dead this time apparently because it worked when they wired it directly. It was a blown fuse and they replaced it. Its been 2 days since that and just today morning the alternator/dynamo I'm not sure what its called died in the middle of the road. Not sure if this is all related to the fan.
    – Gotem
    Sep 12, 2023 at 19:27

1 Answer 1

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You have a high resistance connection to the fan which is causing it to draw too many amps and burn out. A likely culprit is the relay that controls the fan.

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  • Your answer is not possible. A high resistance connection will cause a voltage drop across the bad connection, leading to a drop in current draw.
    – HandyHowie
    Sep 12, 2023 at 14:09
  • @HandyHowie long extension cords (high resistance) and burned out power tools is the non-car version. It's the voltage drop which leads to higher current. The fuse would ideally take care of this.
    – Tiger Guy
    Sep 12, 2023 at 17:12
  • Ohms law proves this wrong (I=V/R) current = voltage / resistance. If the resistance increases, the current drops.
    – HandyHowie
    Sep 12, 2023 at 18:48
  • @HandyHowie that's not how motors work, the motor will draw more amps to meet its power requirement
    – Tiger Guy
    Sep 12, 2023 at 18:50
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    I got it checked up and the fan wasn't dead this time apparently because it worked when they wired it directly. It was a blown fuse and they replaced it. Its been 2 days since that and just today morning the alternator/dynamo I'm not sure what its called died in the middle of the road. Not sure if this is all related to the fan.
    – Gotem
    Sep 12, 2023 at 19:22

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