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Update: I've had it checked out by a local workshop, they said it's all good.


Follow up to this question.

When installing my steel rims, I've stupidly put the wheel nuts on backwards. It was possible because on my car you can put them on both ways on the studs, as both sides of the nuts are hollow.

As a result the cone shaped side of the lug nuts wasn't facing the wheel as it should, instead the flat side of the nuts was touching the wheels. Because I torqued the nuts to spec (135Nm/100ft lbs), the flat side of the nuts has "dug" into and deformed one of the rims: enter image description here

the other rims are looking alright, it seems it only happened on this one (front right if it matters).

Between "replace immediately" or "doesn't matter", how serious is this? If it needs to be replaced, am I fine to drive another ~2 months like this before I switch to summer tires?

Edit - for reference, here are undamaged mounting holes

enter image description here

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  • Can you add another photo of an un-damaged mounting hole. You don't need to take the wheel off the vehicle, just remove one of the nuts.
    – HandyHowie
    Feb 13, 2023 at 10:16
  • @HandyHowie done (I already had a picture)
    – user4520
    Feb 13, 2023 at 11:15

1 Answer 1

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The main reason for the cone shapes on the wheel nuts is to stop even the smallest amount of rotation of the wheel relative to the hub.

Without the cone, each time you accelerated or braked, the wheel could rotate slightly on the hub and knock against the studs.

The damage appears to be very minimal with just a small amount of rolling over of the outside of the hole. As long as the nuts tighten against the wheel and the hole hasn't been enlarged so that the tapered end of the nut is able to hit the hub flange, then they should be fine.

I would tighten the nuts to the correct torque and check them often for a while to make sure they are staying tight. You may find that the damage is pressed back into shape.

If in doubt, you could take them to a tyre shop and ask them to check them for you.

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