0

If I am going to put Waxoyl or equivalent onto areas that don't need to have a pretty black sheen, does it make sense to use the "clear" version so that any new build up of rust can be seen when checking it - does it work like that?

I know that it's not as tough as thick underseal but I've been looking at the absolute horror stories of the black stuff which looks wonderful until you find the new corrosion it's been hiding.

3
  • 1
    Perhaps it was the skills of those applying the protection coating in those horror stories...
    – Solar Mike
    Aug 2 at 6:17
  • 1
    metal (iron, steel) wants to return to its original state, all you can do is delay that. Ok, disappearing comments so won't continue.
    – Solar Mike
    Aug 2 at 6:56
  • True, and I would fully expect to clean and clear the area of existing rust before putting it on, which I guess some people don't do. But still I could imagine if moisture manages to creep in after you've done it then it could make it a lot worse and it wouldn't even be visible. Unless it just doesn't tend to go wrong unless the job wasn't done properly?
    – andy29
    Aug 2 at 6:58
1

Years ago the thick ,black, "undercoating" did promote corrosion over time. Laboratory testing ( Amoco oil) showed that as the coating aged it could crack , then dirt and ( more important) salty water (deicing salts) would get under it accelerating rust of undercarriage. As I remember those doing the test thought it was best to leave the steel bare.

1
  • That's what I thought could happen, so it doesn't even need to be a result of a badly done job then. And the last thing I need is to give the car hidden new rust, I would prefer to be aware of that starting happen :)
    – andy29
    Aug 3 at 5:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.