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I have a spare tire: it from a '94 Nissan pickup. It is only for temporary use as it is smaller than the other four tires.

As I understand it, it is critical that spare tires be used only on vehicles that Nissan intended it to be used on. Is there any way to:

  • find the part number of the 1994 spare tire
  • determine which year / make / model were outfitted with said part number?

The goal is to understand which vehicles can use the spare tire.

enter image description here

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  • what did your research show?
    – Moab
    Jul 27 '20 at 23:04
  • getting a matching rim to the original 4 is not the same as one of those "spacesavers"...
    – Solar Mike
    Jul 28 '20 at 4:42
  • To confirm, you aren't looking to replace your spare, you want to see what other vehicles can use the same spare? Is this a limited service spare or a full one?
    – GdD
    Jul 28 '20 at 7:26
  • @GdD. Thanks for the good clarifying question. Updating the OP
    – gatorback
    Jul 28 '20 at 20:24
  • Are you sure it's a limited service spare? That would be unusual for a pickup from my experience.
    – GdD
    Jul 29 '20 at 7:33
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If that wheel and tire came with the truck, then the tire is 26 years old.

Tires degrade with age. Because of this age-related degradation, the tire is unsafe. Don't use it. Don't put it in anyone else's hands.

The wheel may well be useable, but the tire is junk and should be discarded forthwith.

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  • Yikes! I just used the spare in my 95 Integra last week to drive a flat to the tire shop. Is it possible to visually inspect the integration spare to determine if it is usable?
    – gatorback
    Jul 29 '20 at 16:03
  • I don't think so. Rubber's resiliency (it's "hysteresis") degrades with age and ozone. It may look OK, but is underneath degraded. Some may differ - and my view comes also from being a motorcycle rider, where anything over five years comes off the bike without regard to mileage because the consequences of tire failure are so much higher — but I think 10 years is enough for car tire. As I said, I would not use a 26-year-old tire at all. Jul 29 '20 at 16:36

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