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I drive a 2000 Chevy 1500 with the 5.3l engine and 4wd. I do all my own work, but I'm slightly baffled by this one.

Driving on bumpy roads, specifically the ones around my house, the brake pedal gets stuck and I lose braking power. I've done a little googling but haven't had any luck, and can't really figure out how to word it.

Let me put it this way: I'm driving, about 30 mph on a bumpy dirt road. Coming up to my turn, I start braking. Unfortunately, the worst bumps on the road are right before the stop sign. Pressing down on the pedal, I feel a pop. Nothing major, I just feel something release. The brake pedal seems to move back with my foot as if I were releasing pressure. I try pressing the pedal back down harder, considering I'm about to barrel into the person on the other side at 30 mph, and the pedal does not move and I maintain coasting speed. It eventually releases (we're probably talking quarter seconds here) and I manage to stop.

Does this all the time, and I'm so used to the roads I know when it's coming, so I'm ready to stop. Still a pain in the ass, though. Sometimes, pressing and releasing the pedal multiple times as I come to a stop makes this less noticable and helps stop quicker. My buddy's truck doesn't do this. Why does my truck do this?

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  • Your description is a bit hard to follow. It sounds like you're saying there is some acquired stickyness to the pedal, like it's jammed in the "where it is when my foot is not on it" position, then you press the pedal, and it frees up and moves a bit them jams again and no matter how hard you push, the brake pads do not contact the rotors and slow the truck. If you stamp on it repeatedly it frees up and descends normally so that the brakes do operate. Is that right? – Caius Jard Jul 21 '20 at 7:31
  • Based on your description you may have some very old brake fluid in your system. As brake fluid ages, it collects water. Then when it gets too hot the water boils and introduced air into the closed system. This will lead to some erratic brake pedal reaction. Usually it feels like there's air in the system (because there is). – Jupiter Jul 21 '20 at 9:30
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    Its a problem with the ABS system. – Moab Jul 21 '20 at 17:58

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