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Long story short: the ac of my 2013 Rogue is not working and I am in the process of eliminating various possibilities. One of these is the amount of refrigerant in the system. Hence my question:

With the engine off, what should the normal range for refrigerant pressure be? My understanding is that when the engine is off the pressure on the low pressure side and the high pressure side should be identical.

I do realize that what matters is where the pressures are at when the car engine and ac are running. But for my own reason I don't wish to turn on the ac (I have just replaced the pulley, the clutch plate, and the coil; I wish to make sure the ac compressor and refrigerant level are normal before I turn on the ac, lest there is another problem that may damage my new parts).

Is there a normal range for refrigerant pressure for when the car engine is off? I have come across various posts online where people say the normal range should be 25-40 psi on the low side and 200-270 psi on the high side. But this is for when the ac is running.

Thank you so much.

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  • As long as the compressor itself turns without issue (you should be able to do this by hand), there should be no issue or concern for the new parts. If the pressure is too low for the AC to be working, the system will not energize the AC clutch. Jul 2 '20 at 15:57
  • Thank you, Paulster2. I can turn the compressor (by turning the clutch plate), but it is very stiff.
    – Joseph C.
    Jul 2 '20 at 19:18
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There is no "standard" for pressure when the system is OFF. You can only take meaningful measurements while the system is running. The figures you have quoted are general. For you specific vehicle you should look at the service specifications which will tell you the pressure ranges based on outside temperature as well as the refrigerant charge.

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  • Thank you jwh20. I will look up the specifications. Thank you.
    – Joseph C.
    Jul 2 '20 at 19:18

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