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Has anyone compiled list of OBD-II protocols (physical layers) used by various vehicles? they're required to be J2534 compatible but what about manufacturer specific pins? is it even common for manufacturers to put extra protocols on the connector?

like SW-CAN on GM vehicles. Opel also has K-Line protocols on multiple pins(?)

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is it even common for manufacturers to put extra protocols on the connector?

Yes, Its very common autos have additional protocols on obd2 and even internally that are not accessible via obd.

Some good starting information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_bus

Has anyone compiled list of OBD-II protocols (physical layers) used by various vehicles?

Not sure of some large master lists but you can gather what information you need from the web and make specific schematics.

This site seems to have a lot of them that are accessible by OBD2: https://pinoutguide.com/CarElectronics/

Standards for all OBD2's.

obd2

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  • which is most common manufacturer specific protocol you've come across? can bus on pins 3,11 and 12,13? – user57359 May 4 at 19:48
  • I don't think you could call anything common, they are all over the place depending on the year and make. But for additional oem specific cans its usually on 3/11 from what I remember. – narkeleptk May 5 at 0:50
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There are common codes, then manufacturer/vehicle specific codes.

The companies doing the really good obd scanners probably have most of them and they issue updates occasionally but I don’t think they give them away...

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  • I'm interested in just reading the data, not decoding diagnostic codes – user57359 May 4 at 15:12
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This information is proprietary. Pro Scan tool manufacturers spend many thousands of hours sampling/deciphering vehicle data and reverse-engineering from OEM tool communications. This is the very value of their product. They would be unlikely to publish this data to the general public.

It's like asking Colonel Sanders what his recipe is.

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  • I already commented this in other answer, I'm interested in just reading the RAW data, not decoding diagnostic codes – user57359 May 5 at 11:58
  • You don't need us then. Just plug in an oscilloscope and start recording raw data. There are only 16 pins to record from, and most of them are empty or contain B+ or ground. If this doesn't answer your question, I'm not sure what you are asking for. – Matt May 12 at 5:26
  • accepted answer is more like what I was looking for – user57359 May 13 at 21:07

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