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Is there anything can do with this and similar connectors to improve the electrical quality of the connection and avoid intermittent disconnecting?

Connector

I saw this thread but it seems to focus on other things besides the actual contact surfaces .

Background: I'm having a problem where the signal from the pictured sensor intermittently fails; it'll work correctly for periods, then lose signal for a few seconds or a minute, then work correctly again for a while, and so on. I've heard that sometimes these connectors can provide low quality connections so would like to try and eliminate that as a source of the problem.

  • Best practice is to make sure they are clean and tight. Vibration sounds like you enemy here, make sure the wires and connectors are secure. – Solar Mike Jan 8 at 9:39
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    The plugs and socket connection itself is usually very reliable, so long as they are clean and not mechanically damaged (e.g. bent pins). But there may be an fault where the cable is connected internally to the plug, and the wire can move around making intermittent connections. The most practical repair is a new cable. Try wiggling the cable near the connector to see if you can create the fault and isolate which of the two cables is causing the problem. – alephzero Jan 8 at 9:44
  • One way to help make the connection, if it is exclusively the connection which is at fault (interface between pin and socket) is to look at what part of the socket actually provides the contact, then bend the pin slightly in that direction. The thinking is here, if the pin is bent slightly (and I'm talking a couple of degrees), it will be forced to make a stronger contact between itself and the socket. In your image, the socket appears to have the metal connectors towards the bottom, this is the direction you'd move the pins. Others have a clam shell, which means they could move either way – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jan 8 at 16:11
  • OK. Is there any benefit to cleaning the pins or applying any conductive spray or grease ? – M.M Jan 8 at 20:57
  • Make sure the power is totally off, then I'd spray the exposed pins with plastic safe contact cleaner, then gently scrape and file with a needle file. Then spray a bit too much cleaner on the exposed pins and connect the connector to try to clean the internal connector. You can use a NON conductive protective grease to prevent future corrosion and possible water infiltration and possible intermittent short circuit. – Andyz Smith Jan 8 at 23:16
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Make sure the power is totally off, then spray the exposed pins with plastic safe contact cleaner, then gently scrape and file with a needle file. Then spray a bit too much cleaner on the exposed pins and connect the connector to try to clean the internal connector. You can use a NON conductive protective grease to prevent future corrosion and possible water infiltration and possible intermittent short circuit.

Conductive and non conductive grease:

Most lubricants are somewhat conductive. There is a special purpose silicone 'bulb grease' that is viscous, water repelling, et cetera -- a protective lubricant -- but which does not conduct electricity at all.

The reason to use this bulb grease is that you have no way to prevent a conductive grease from touching two adjacent pins, two pins, specifically by design, separated by the NON conductive, plastic.

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use electric contact cleaner sprays available on the market..

https://www.homedepot.com/p/WD-40-SPECIALIST-11-oz-Contact-Cleaner-30055/307599950

https://www.amazon.in/s?k=electric+contact+cleaner&sprefix=electric+con&ref=nb_sb_ss_i_3_12

or otherwise, you can use any automotive mass air flow sensor spray, which is plastic safe cleaner....

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