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Considering normal everyday use. What factors may cause a generic vehicle/engine to lose some of it's power over time? I recently did a dyno test and noticed that my torque output has decreased compared to the dyno test I took when the car was new. I'm trying to list all the common possible culprits such as dirty injectors, clogged fuel filter, or even lower tire pressure that might hinder optimal vehicle/engine performance.

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    If you used a different dyno, that could be your issue. There are a ton of factors which don't even involve the car itself, such as air density and temperature, who was operating the dyno, as well as the calibration of the dyno. I hope you are considering all of these things as they are a factor in why it would be different. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Dec 11 '19 at 22:45
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    Interesting question. How long time are we talking about? Let's ignore external factors (like the one @Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 speaks about). I would guess (I don't have anything to back it up though): - Blowby - Reduced clearance in bearing => increased resistance - Loss of timing (only for carbs) - Dirt in injectors or in carbs What am I missing? – Markus Dec 12 '19 at 7:49
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    I found a very interesting article which lists all the common problems that can lead to power loss. While there are lot of external factors and human error while measuring etc. this post typically lists the internal factors of the engine and its supportive parts. [link] (axleaddict.com/auto-repair/What-Causes-Low-Engine-Power) – SaharshJ Dec 12 '19 at 8:52
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    It's an interesting question, but too broad. There are many things that can cause an engine to lose power over time. – GdD Dec 12 '19 at 8:59