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I have a 2012 honda civic sedan. I am thinking to do some noise deadening to it. I am not really good with cars to thinking to do it only for trunk and bonnet.

Would it have any noticeable impact on noice reduction?

I also don't have much idea what kind of material I should use for trunk and bonnet. I am thinking about following, would that work?

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000328608837.html?spm=a2g0o.productlist.0.0.708612ad0FXA4V&algo_pvid=a0165e2a-87e3-481a-bd49-ae478e8f6521&algo_expid=a0165e2a-87e3-481a-bd49-ae478e8f6521-5&btsid=57004a46-4bb9-4730-8526-8f84b1cdd33c&ws_ab_test=searchweb0_0,searchweb201602_2,searchweb201603_55

  • Underhood sound insulation does help, and is commonly found on higher end cars, and missing on base models. I'd start with the doors, they are often poorly insulated, and since they're closer to your ears, you hear more of the road noise transmitted through them. – Phil G Dec 5 '19 at 17:50
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    Is it engine noise or road noise you have a problem with? – GdD Dec 5 '19 at 17:54
  • @GdD road noice. I don't think engine is making much noice. and too only when I am running on highway with 80km or more. – Gaurang Shah Dec 5 '19 at 18:19
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If (as per your comments) you're looking to deaden road noise as opposed to engine noise then you aren't going to see much improvement from installing/up grading the under-bonnet sound insulation.

The sound deadening under the carpet and inside the doors is more the area you want to look at - however there's a great deal of effort involved there in taking carpets up, disassembling door trim and removing the existing deadening material and then replacing it. And even then you might not see much gains. There will be sound deadening material there and you will have to remove it in places to get the new stuff to fit.

Overall it's possible spend quite a lot of cash to get stuff there that is going to be significantly better, something like Dynamat is pretty decent. Even so you're still going to get quite significant sound levels leaking in through the windows, the door gaps and so on.

Another area that's worth considering is reducing the noise generated in the first place - you can get tires that are quieter (the noise rating on tires is based on a drive by test but as a rule of thumb the quieter-rated the tires the less noise in the cabin too) and fitting smaller wheels with larger profile tires will make a big difference too. Also worth thinking when you last had your suspension bushes refreshed - the car is ~7 years old now and as bushes age and the rubber hardens they absorb less vibration and transmit more noise to the cabin.

  • I'm with @motosubatsu on this, it isn't likely to be worth the costs and time involved. – GdD Dec 6 '19 at 23:11
  • Jay Leno swears by Dynamat. But I agree that reducing noise will be very, very difficult. Honda has already spent tens of thousands of dollars minimizing noise in the cabin of their most popular car. – Sam Dec 6 '19 at 23:37

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