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I own a 2000 hyundai Accent (No ABS). I have brakes that function without the proper sensitivity and just can't firm up like my other Accent (same model)


Sequence of Events

  1. I replaced the front calipers, rotors, and pads.
  2. Bled brakes in sequence several times (vacuum bled and two man method), but couldn't firm up the pedal.
  3. I replaced the brake master cylinder and bench bled before installation. Pedal pressure was identical before and after installation.
  4. Bled lines again.
  5. Cursed....many times.
  6. Considered selling car.😱
  7. Posted my question here.

It just feels like air is leaking somewhere...but where? How? Please help prevent my psychotic break (brake? 😜).

  • How old are the hoses? Why did you replace calipers and pads? How sure are you that you got all air out of the system? – DamoC Nov 30 '19 at 22:27
  • @DamoC Bleeders were completely stripped and the existing calipers were seizing so I replaced the calipers with the pads. I'm very sure my bleeding was perfect. The hoses looked like they were in okay shape, so I didn't replace em. – Mark Witmer Nov 30 '19 at 22:42
  • I'm unsure as to why you replaced the calipers and not the hoses. They may look fine but a caliper would only need a rebuild.... not a hard or expensive job. The bleeders fair enogh if caliper was replaced because of that. DO you have any drum brakes or all disc? Are you sure your new calipers aren't leaking? How old are the brake lines? – DamoC Nov 30 '19 at 22:51
  • @DamoC I had originally planned to rebuild the calipers, but that is besides the point. I have limited tools and budget. Not replacing the hoses was a compromise in that area, and again, they are in decent shape. The rear are drums and were replaced about a year ago. Given that I don't have fluid level changes, I'm going to say the new calipers are not leaking. Also, this is a winter vehicle. It's not year-round daily. – Mark Witmer Nov 30 '19 at 23:02
  • Check this: mechanics.stackexchange.com/q/71904/10976 and this: mechanics.stackexchange.com/q/72954/10976 Really if you have not sorted it yet then take it to a professional - failing breaks could injure others... – Solar Mike Dec 1 '19 at 7:03
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If you have no air in the system, and if your master cylinder is functioning properly, there is a possibility that the parking brakes are misadjusted or not functioning properly causing too much brake pedal movement before shoes make sufficient contact with the drums.

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  • Currently, I've had a non-functioning parking brake for a number of years – Mark Witmer Dec 1 '19 at 0:27
  • Are the star adjusters adjusted properly? – Jupiter Dec 1 '19 at 2:01
  • The rear drum brakes were installed by a mechanic and really haven't been touched since then, so I'm going to assume they're adjusted properly. – Mark Witmer Dec 1 '19 at 15:00
  • If you have no leaks and a good functioning master cylinder, there's only two things I can think of that can cause this. A brake hose is expanding while braking, or self adjusters (star) are out of adjustment. The drum brakes were done one year ago. It is very possible that they have become sticky, especially if they did not replace them. If this were me that is the first place I'd look at this point. – Jupiter Dec 1 '19 at 15:23
  • Well, Its shaping up that I'll be taking it back to the mechanic who did the rear brakes, (the drums were replaced in this case). – Mark Witmer Dec 1 '19 at 15:29

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