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I got 45 ah battery in my car full charged 12.6v and has GREEN colour on the too indicator. It was left unused recently for 2 days, and next day, I checked the battery which gives 12.4v, however, the status indicator shows WHITE colour as picture attached herewith. No hard staring issues. I used the car and eventually it attains 12.6 volt but the WHITE COLOR STILL EXISTS?!!

As per the battery, GREEN is FULLY charged, WHITE is NEEDS CHARGING, RED is SERVICING.

Now, my point is why WHITE COLOUR is showing up, at the same time 12.6 v reads on multimeter??

HOW TO GET BACK GREEN COLOR UNDER 12.6 VOLT.

enter image description here

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  • Does the battery have enough power to start the vehicle? When you run the vehicle, how long do you run it for? (ie: just quick trips to the store or long drives to work?) How old is the battery? Something to remember, the "eye" is just an indicator. It may or may not give you the true health of the battery. Also, 12.4 or 12.6vdc is a little low for a battery in good health. Depending on the age of the battery, I'd expect it to be nearer to 13v or over. Try charging the battery, either through prolonged driving or on a charger at a low level and see what happens. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Sep 1 '19 at 13:25
  • No starting issues, just normal. The battery is just 6 months old. I'm surprised the reading is 12.6 Vol, however, the magic eye still shows white COLOUR!!!! – Thang Tons Sep 1 '19 at 13:28
  • And the "magic eye" is just an indicator. Don't put too much faith in what it's showing. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Sep 1 '19 at 14:00
  • I enquired about the magic eye from the dealer how important it is?? They said if it shows white colour, it can not pull the required gravity to start the engine and battery life time will be diminished gradually!!! – Thang Tons Sep 1 '19 at 14:08
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This indicator is almost pointless. The only reason it exists is that is increases sales of new batteries.

Translation of colors:

Green: electrolyte is dense enough (battery charged above some point) and high enough level.

Black (white on some brands): electrolyte is watered down (battery somewhat depleted) and still high enough level.

White (red on some brands): electrolyte is low. May need topping up with deionized water (but the battery is likely marketed as maintenance-free and hard to open, so no topping up possible).

The green color may be a matter of mixing the electrolyte. A fully charged battery turn green only when shaked.

The level somewhat depends on the temperature, a hot battery may have somewhat higher level.

Whatever the indicator shows, it is immersed in one cell, others (esp. in older battery) may be in another state.


The voltage of the battery (with no engine running) is pointless as well.

Less than 12.0V - battery depleted or bad

12.1..13.0 - battery MAYBE in some state of charge other than completely depleted.

Above 13.1V - battery in some rare failure mode with voltage above normal, no good behavior expected.

One cannot deduce a state of charge of a lead-acid battery by its open circuit voltage, other than to distinguish between completely depleted and somewhat charged.


In short, don't worry abouth the battery eye.

If the battery performs well, leave it alone. If it doesn't - replace it.

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  • Battery eye indicator is more useful and reliable than voltage reading. Why? I have come across in my car battery reading 12.6 v but still indicator is white which is for needs charging. So, serviced for regular charging and took about 2 hrs for the indicator to show green. But, if battery still shows white and shows 11 v, then, regular charging to regain 12.6 v and green colour takes about 10 hrs. This automatically implies that eye indicator is more precised than the voltmeter reading. So, a 12.6 v on battery without eye indicator may be misleading to the idea that battery is full charged!!! – Thang Tons Jan 1 at 5:35

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