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My 2003 Chevy Tahoe rear driver side wheel came off while on the highway. Nobody was hurt and I was able to grind over to the side of the road (all fortunate). My lug studs were bent so I replaced all of them. The drivetrain and gears look ok, as does the rotor. For now I used the spare that came with the truck (full sized, different rim). The rim of the other tire is damaged. A shop recommended I replace it. I was wondering if it is repairable. Here are some pictures: close up rim medium view rim side view rim

My concern is that the aluminum that is around the edges will rub into the tire and eventually put a hole in it. I'm wondering if I can potentially take the tire off, use a sander to smooth out the edges, and then put the tire back on.

What else might I need to do, or is my only safe option to replace the rim entirely (and the tire too?)

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    Is the risk to yourself and your family worth the cost of a new rim? I think that is the pertinent question. – BillDOe Jul 30 at 20:12
  • Other than using the side of a flat bladed screwdriver around the outer rim to knock off any seriously high/sharp points I wouldn't bother. That damage appears largely superficial (but feel free to measure the inner diameter of one of the other rims vs this one to gauge how much material is missing) and would respond well to a rub down and re-paint. Having stripped the alloy coating, if left then it could corrode sufficiently to weaken the rim after several years of driving in harsh conditions. If you're in a dry part of the world I dare say it would be fine with just the intrinsic oxidation – Caius Jard Oct 26 at 20:52
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It looks repairable, but not a DIY job. There are myriads of places now that can restore rims to almost new, or at least make a professional judgement whether it's even worth attempting repair.

It's difficult to tell if the rubbing on the inside of the rim has created cracks that can later fail.

For probably less money than getting it restored, you can find a matching used rim on a place like eBay or similar.

Unless you own stock in a sandpaper company, there's no prudent way to fix that in your garage.

  • can you elaborate on how i would repair it? – USER_8675309 Jul 31 at 16:34

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