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This differential unit comes with threaded adjusters for both carrier bearing. The car manual talks about using dial and torque gauges to adjust the bearings preload, but I don't have any of those tools. I have heard about adjusting both sides by counting the adjusters turns, then put in the gearbox, place it vertical and further adjust the adjuster that's on top, so the weight of the unit plays some role here. Then put it vertical over this side and readjust the other adjuster. Turn one of the axles while trying to stop the other and check there shouldn't be any lateral play and little "turnwise" play. Any suggestions?

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Could I use a normal torque wrench to measure this?

Could I use a normal torque wrench to measure this?

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    I'm by NO MEANS an expert on the build of a diff, however, my understanding is, if you are not replacing the ring and pinion gears, you need only reuse the shims which are there to regain the proper clearances between the ring/pinion gears. From your description of the damage, you are only replacing the one carrier bearing. If you don't take the pinion out of the differential, you shouldn't have to worry about preload on the pinion bearing. You'll absolutely need to torque the carrier bolts, though. There may be a way to get around it using a known weight and lever length. This is MHO, though. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Nov 14 '18 at 2:16
  • Correct, not changing the pinion/ring but only the damaged carrier bearing. The issue is that its track is inserted in a housing element that also holds the threaded adjuster. To remove the old track, I had to remove the thread adjuster, therefore loosing the adjustment, which btw, seems to me part of the failure (wasn't locked). The other side's carrier bearing is ok, but I also had to remove it from its housing because I wanted to inspect everything for loose debris from the damaged parts. So both adjusters are removed... – Aram Alvarez Nov 14 '18 at 2:25
  • Gotcha. That's quite a predicament. I wonder if Zaid might have some ideas – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Nov 14 '18 at 2:51
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Use a bar (lever) of a known length and a set of spring scales as torque is given in pounds feet or Newton metres.

| improve this answer | |
  • ...and if I attach a torque wrench at the end of the axle, and measure it that way? I have a digital module that fits any wrench... – Aram Alvarez Nov 14 '18 at 14:25
  • You have 3 questions, I answered the first two... – Solar Mike Nov 14 '18 at 14:59

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