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I'm not sure if this is the right for for this, but my 2011 Nissan Maxima has it's AC controls in the same part as it's stereo controls (see here) and I would like to replace my stereo. This means I will be losing my AC controls. But I found another AC controller (see here) for this car (for another model) and I would like to see if I can wire it to the harness of the current AC controller. The plugs are different, but I can hard wire it.

My question is, how can I figure out the wiring diagram of each controller, what tools will I need, and where is the best place to start?

UPDATE

I got the connector diagram for both plugs, and the wiring seems pretty similar on both. The only thing I'm not sure about is the CAN wires and the RX/TX wires. I'm assuming they are for the same thing.

Is there any way for me to test this? Also, would connecting this up risk me frying my ECU or AC computer, or will it just trip a fuse if something goes wrong?

Here are the links to the harness plug wiring diagrams:

Plug 1 Plug 2

Thanks!

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  • In most cases, this won't work. These are two separate control units. Usually there will be separate electronics behind the separate controllers. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Oct 21 '18 at 23:11
  • First step is getting the wiring diagram for both cars, and compare the wiring for the AC. – cde Oct 21 '18 at 23:32
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Well, it may be possible. You will need the diagrams for your car and that of the donor car. Then you need to work out the functions and make sure all are covered.

I know this has been done on other cars, retro-fitting automatic A/C to a car with manual A/C and not only controls changed, but there were motors and bits that needed to be added. Interestingly the wiring was the same (ie the correct wires were already in place) on that vehicle.

  • Just cut out a rectangle in a used panel from the junk yard and buy a kit to fit it in, if it don't work then it's better than loosing a perfectly good original panel – user38183 Oct 22 '18 at 11:49

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