3

With all the cost, trouble, loss-of-use, and inability to shut the vehicle off if electronics fail associated with "smart" keys, if I ever get a car that needs one I think I'd want to adapt it to start and stop with an ordinary mechanical key or other mechanism. Is there any clean, established way to do this? The most obvious solution that comes to mind is permanently mounting the original smart key inside the dash and adding an after-market ignition key unit, but are there better ways to disable the system or issues with leaving the smart key in the vehicle full-time?

closed as too broad by Zaid, Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2, vini_i, Fred Wilson, DucatiKiller Dec 14 '15 at 0:06

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • The article you linked to talks about a car that's been adapted for disabled drivers It looks like that's the system that failed. It doesn't say anything about not being able to turn off. Although it seems very likely that he would have tried. What happens when you turn the power button off with your foot on the accelerator? – Move More Comments Link To Top Dec 16 '13 at 14:55

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.