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My car has the factory dash display, and it shows the engine redlining at 6000 rpm. It is a 2010 Chevy Camaro 2SS/RS with a 6.2L V8.

This car has also had a MagnaCharger Supercharger installed in it. From reading online, I cannot determine if this will change the point at which the engine redlines.

Since the factory dash is based on the factory engine and parts, and the line is just essentially hardcoded in, there would obviously be no change there based on changes to the car's components.

So I was curious, in what way would installing a supercharger change the point at which an engine redlines?

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    I don't have any empirical evidence for you, so will leave this as a comment. IMHO, a supercharger will not change a redline. The redline is a factor of the mechanical abilities of the engine (internal components), and has nothing to do with the with anything the supercharger does to it (basically adding hp). If you don't change anything internally on the engine (rods, crank, bearing clearances, etc, etc, etc), you won't be changing anything to do with the redline. This is world according to Paul, so I could be all off base. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Apr 18 '18 at 21:26
  • As Paulster2 says the S/C won't change the redline - all it does is increase the power through the existing rev range once it starts to deliver. To increase the redline you need to change the balance of the crank, change the valve timing so the charge starts coming in earlier etc... – Solar Mike Apr 18 '18 at 21:33
  • Again, no hands-on experience here. While I agree generally with Paulster2 and Solar Mike, I'll add that a supercharger pressurizes the motor's intake, thus increasing the amount of air and fuel consumed in each combustion event. This (hopefully) will increase the amount of power produced by each event, compared the power produced without a supercharger. Any increased power at any rpm will necessarily increase physical stress on the motor. Thus, it's theoretically possible that the addition of a supercharger will reduce the engine's safe rpm limit. – David supports Monica Apr 18 '18 at 21:57
  • @David - That was my main concern, that the safe range was actually lowered as a result of the supercharger. I don't really redline vehicles anyway, and try to stay safely away from the range altogether, however if the range is closer to 5500 that could be a concern. I try to always give the redline a 1000 rpm buffer. – Travis J Apr 18 '18 at 22:30
  • @Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 - That there is no change was my assumption as well, and since there didn't seem to be any documentation of it I kind of assumed that was probably the case. That said, I am certainly no expert in engine mechanics and was hoping to get some input. To be fair, while your commented response may be just your opinion, it is based on specific expertise and is an expert opinion and as a result I think it would still be fair to post it as an answer here. – Travis J Apr 18 '18 at 22:34
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I don't have any empirical evidence for you, so this is mostly opinion. IMHO, a supercharger will not change a redline. The redline is a factor of the mechanical abilities of the engine (internal components), and has nothing to do with anything the supercharger does to it (basically adding hp). If you don't change anything internally on the engine (rods, crank, bearing clearances, etc, etc, etc), you won't be changing anything to do with the redline.

With that said, the LS3 (manual) or L99 (auto) engines there are some minor things which you'll need to worry about, but the redline is not one of them. You'd experience valve float (with a stock valve trane) before there'd be an issue which is going to cause you damage to your engine. While valve float is not a good thing, it's not the end of the world.

From what I was just reading, the redline should be 6500rpm and then there's a rev limiter which kicks in at 6600rpm. This means there really should be no issue with over revving, unless your tuner changed these settings. With the correct valve train, guys are revving these past 7000rpm, with forced induction, and a stock bottom end, without issue. The stock bottom ends on these are good to over a 1000hp.

Realize, though, when you put more power through an engine, whether by tuning or by parts, you are going to affect the life of the engine. It will incur more wear and tear. It's just the nature of the business. How much will it shorten it by? I couldn't tell you, as there's no magic formula. On your car, you need to worry about the rear differential and drive axles. These were relatively weak from the factory. They were good for the stock engine, but once you start throwing power at them, you're just begging for it to blow. There are some good kits on the market which are direct replacements which are good for your needs. I'd highly suggest you make this your next mod.

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I run a supercharger on my race car and it will definitely affect the safe RPM limit of a motor, the red line, as it increases the stresses of the internal components, the factory settings do not account for additional speed equipment added after the car was manufactured.

Any kind of problem with a normally aspirated motor are greatly increased on a supercharged motor; valve float, lean condition and incorrect timing are examples that can have a catastrophic affect on a supercharged motor.

Also, supercharger efficiency is reduced at higher RPM's so red lining the motor would probably result in less power.

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