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I was driving down the interstate in top gear, just coasting about 80 to 85 mph (nothing) when it overheated.

The motor basically immediately shut itself down and now it's a no crank, no start.

Can someone throw a couple ideas of what might have happened?

Timing did not skip or loosen, and I'm thinking the head warped or bent a valve. Would it be easier to replace the motor, or tear it apart and rebuild it?

  • Welcome to Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair! Sounds like you seized the engine. It might restart once completely cooled (many engines do), but that doesn't mean you haven't caused damage to it. Will most likely incur a rebuild with a lot of engine work, or possibly a new engine. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jan 14 '18 at 18:54
  • Is there Any specific part of the motor you think might have siezed up to cause this ? – Mykey Hanson Jan 14 '18 at 19:05
  • Could it possibly by any chance be simple and be one of the head gaskets – Mykey Hanson Jan 14 '18 at 20:36
  • The definition of "seized" is, the pistons/rings get so hot, they get stuck in the cylinder bore. They may/may not contract enough to come un-seized, but there is going to be permanent damage done.If it won't turn over and you have good battery power and the starter works (will spin) (did before, should now), your engine is most likely toast. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jan 14 '18 at 22:05
  • Ok i got the motor to turn manually behind the wheel finder so the motor is not seized – Mykey Hanson Jan 15 '18 at 0:48
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Even if the motor turns, that does not mean it hasn't seized as it could have been a soft seize, in which the rings do damage to the cylinder walls without getting stuck. There are three parts needed for combustion in an engine: fuel, spark, and compression. Fuel and spark aren't likely to have changed from overheating, but compression definitely could.

Do a compression test to start with, you should have definitely no less than 100psi compression, with all cylinders within about 15psi of each other. Most likely given the failure scenario, all cylinders will be low on compression.

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