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Working on a 2013 Chevrolet Impala LS, 3.6L VVT Engine.

I need to remove the thermostat housing in order to replace the thermostat. After much pushing, shoving and swearing I managed to get the three bolts out of the housing, so it's loose - but I can't free it because the loom is in the way.

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The loom is the black item in the center of the picture, with the thermostat housing to the left. The loom goes to the front bank of cylinders and the rear bank, with a lot of sensors coming off it - given the choice, I'd rather not disconnect them all. Wondering if anyone has come across this issue before, or has any suggestions on how to gain enough clearance to get the housing out?

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    In most instances, you need to remove the loom to get at other parts. I had to remove the complete upper loom on my Civic in order to get a busted hose which the lower part of the loom was in the way of ... PITB, for sure, but sometimes you have to do what you have to do. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Dec 16 '17 at 15:56
  • I'm unfamiliar with the engine compartment of your car. But I've wrestled with the same challenge in other vehicles. Often, the loom is located rigidly so it won't contact either a heat-producing part or a vibrating part. Usually, one can gain additional movement of the loom by snipping or disconnecting the zipties (or other fasteners) that hold the loom in place. Begin where you want movement, and start disconnecting in both directions. When there's a foot or two of disconnection, the loom may move enough to allow the removal and reinstallation of the housing. – David Dec 16 '17 at 18:28
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On reflection, I think my comment qualifies as an answer.

I'm unfamiliar with the engine compartment of your car. But I've wrestled with the same challenge in other vehicles. Often, the loom is located rigidly so it won't contact either a heat-producing part or a vibrating part.

Usually, one can gain additional movement of a loom by snipping or disconnecting the zipties (or other fasteners) that hold the loom in place. Begin where you want movement, and start disconnecting in both directions. When there's a foot or two of disconnection, the loom may move enough to allow the removal and reinstallation of the housing.

Remember to refasten the loom in place when you're finished working.

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