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Why do honda specs say the throttle cable should have 10mm of play? This means that the gas pedal has 10mm movement or more before the car accelerates. Why do specs say to have play?

Eric the car guy (link here) says that there should be no slack. The reason i ask this is that my 02 Odyssey has one acceleration problem after a transmission rebuild, and the car has no problem when there is recommended slack in the cable, however i hate driving with slack in the gas pedal.

specs picture

  • Keep in mind that this is 10mm of play in this case is deflection from the line of the cable when there is no slack, this does not translate to 10mm of movement in the accelerator pedal, it will be much less. – GdD Sep 20 '17 at 7:46
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The slack is there so that the throttle is not operated ie it keeps the setting decided by the driver, causing unwanted change in speed / power, when the cable flexes due to engine movement or the cable bouncing as the car goes over bumps.

  • have you experienced this personally in a honda? it annoys me that the first ~10mm of gas pedal movement does nothing – Dan Z Sep 20 '17 at 6:52
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    don't own and never have owned a Honda, but have seen the effect of the cable being too tight on many different cars... – Solar Mike Sep 20 '17 at 8:22
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    Since it is your own car you can tune the slack to the minimum value that works for you and does not cause problems. The recommended setting is just a guide that will work on all vehicles produced. on my own honda I have 3-4mm and no issues... – r.anderson Sep 20 '17 at 14:03
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    @DanZ I have had ~10 or so Hondas. Any manufacturer setting is just for consistency and SolarMike's answer comes into play on certain systems. You can adjust the slack to whatever you want. I have my current Civic at ~0.5mm of slack but if you so much as look at the pedal, you're accelerating. It's very much up to your preference. If your engine is bouncing around enough that it's affecting the throttle cable, get your mounts replaced! – finleyarcher Sep 20 '17 at 19:33

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