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My 2001 Durango will start now that I replaced the misfiring plugs but I can't get it to idle, it just shuts off...any ideas?

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    Did you put the leads to the correct positions? You may have forgotten to mark the positions of the leads. You cannot just connect any lead to any plug, they have to be in proper order. – juhist Jul 22 '17 at 10:17
  • @juhist - You should just write an answer. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jul 22 '17 at 13:51
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I believe what your problem is: you have probably placed the leads to incorrect positions. The leads have to be in exactly the correct order. Even mixing two will probably lead to an engine that will not run (unless you have some V16 engine which may work with two leads exchanged).

Now you have two options. Either see somewhere what the correct connection is. If you have a four-cylinder engine, they are typically marked "1", "2", "3" and "4". The distributor may or may not have the numbers marked on it. If it doesn't, I suggest searching for repair manual for your car, as that may have the connection order.

Then you will need to know which cylinder is "1", which is "2" etc. In longitudal inline engines, 1 is usually the front and the highest number is the back, but it may be different in some cars. For transverse engines, I would guess "1" is the leftmost when looking from front of the car rearwards (please correct this if I'm wrong, this may have exceptions). V engines may have slightly more complex cylinder numbering.

An alternative is to try. 4-cylinder engine has 24 different arrangements for the leads (factorial of number 4). If you mark them A, B, C and D, the orders are:

  • ABCD, ABDC, ACBD, ACDB, ADBC, ADCB
  • BACD, BADC, BCAD, BCDA, BDAC, BDCA
  • CABD, CADB, CBAD, CBDA, CDAB, CDBA
  • DABC, DACB, DBAC, DBCA, DCAB, DCBA

So, by marking with A-D, you can try all 24 arrangements with that list.

  • What you're describing is referred to as the firing order, and the official repair manual should have it so you don't have to try all possible combinations. +1 – knoight Oct 23 '17 at 19:48
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Often a computer managed motor adjusts to compensate for a problem, and when the problem is corrected the computer gets confused. That's as deep as I care to go. What may help is to disconnect the battery for 10 minutes so whatever fuzzy logic is in the computer will be erased. Then hook up the battery, restart the vehicle and the computer will reinitialize and start anew. It's a no cost thing that often works.

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An '01 is old enough to need new plugs AND wires, can you test the wires? If new wires don't do it, and you're sure all the plugs are the right kind/gap/working, check the alternator and battery before you replace the ignition coil. This is in addition to the above answers(firing order and "fuzzy logic") - My method of resetting the computer is to take BOTH terminals off the battery, touch the cable ends together for ten seconds, reconnect and start. Cheers!

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