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I would like to set up my bike with auxiliary lights using the LED bulbs I bought. However I would like also to be able to switch those to low or high. I have the equipment for the switch. Now my question is how do I set low beam? Just use a separate circuit with a resistor? But it may heat up I guess. Anyone done something like this?

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When you say low and high, what is your meaning? What is the purpose of having both low and high settings?

On most vehicles low beams (dipped beams) and high beams (mains) are used in different scenarios to best illuminate the road without inconveniencing and blinding other road users. Most applications use different bulbs for low beams and high beams. High beams blast as much light as is reasonable using a beam pattern that is only concerned with putting lots of light in the direction of travel. They usually draw more power than low beam bulbs and have much shorter lives. Low beams need to have a lens or housing with a sharp cut off, so they illuminate the area down on the road as far forward as possible, without much light being directed up into the eyes of oncoming drivers. You would need more than a single LED bulb to satisfy both of these scenarios.

The brightness of LED bulbs is commonly controlled by pulse width modulation. Using resistors with them is not very effective. Instead, they are turned on and off multiple times at different durations every second to give the effect of a greater or lesser amount of light being emitted. If the bulb you have is already been configured for 12v automotive purposes, you might be able to install it inline with a resistor. Like I mentioned earlier though, I'm not sure what that would achieve. You'll end up with a dimmer bulb that is throwing less light down the road, still blinding people, and also a very large or very hot resistor that's just wasting energy as heat.

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I just installed some LED aux lights to my Honda Deauville. I used two relays to control them. First I used a regular 4 pin relay to only switch the LEDs on when the bike was on because they were connected directly to the battery via a 3 amp fuse. The output of the relay was connected to the normally open side of a changeover relay but at the same time it ran to a PWM dimming circuit. The output of the dimmer ran to the normally closed side of the changeover and that relay was wired in to the high beam wire. So now the lights come on via the PWM dimmer on ignition at minimum brightness but then switch to full brightness when you turn the high beams on.

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