4

I didn't see this question asked before under the tag and after searching [audio] wire harness I was curious to know what are the ways you can securely connect an audio wire harness to a factory wire harness?

3

From past experience doing installs I've used several methods:

Military Splice

A military splice works well if you want to tap into an existing harness that gives the option to remove down the road. To perform a military splice you would splice into the current electrical system, separate the insulation and use a pointed tool, like a pick tool, to divide the wires and run your new wire in between. After running the new wire in between fold around the divided wired, wrap with electrical tape and use zip ties to secure the connection, example:

enter image description here

An excellent write up, "Military Splice - How to" and picture used from here.

Soldering

Soldering is typically argued the best way to make a connection between two harnesses. However, a con in this approach is the heat used to melt the solder could burn other wires or wire's insulation leading to electrical issues if the harness being connected cannot be properly isolated. Other than this con all soldered connections should implement either electrical tape or heat shrink tubing:

enter image description here

heat shrink tubing reference

If you're trying to join two harnesses that are not attached to a vehicle there are stands such as a soldering stand that comes in handy:

enter image description here Reference

Crimping

Crimping is an option where you insert the wire on either end and use a crimp tool to make the connection. One issue that is typically run into with crimping is the crimp doesn't make a secure connection or the wire falls out if an incorrect connector is used, example connections:

enter image description here

crimp reference

enter image description here

reference

Fold and tape

Stripped wires are folded or wound together and then taped. Not the greatest way to make a connection and connections have been known to come lose. This approach is frowned upon when doing electrical installs but is still an option.

  • Nice Answer! +1 – DucatiKiller Feb 27 '17 at 17:03
  • thanks, tried to make sure to reference everything with their links to help others – Hᴇʀʙɪᴇ Feb 27 '17 at 17:03
  • I like that military splice never seen that one before. – Ben Feb 28 '17 at 12:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.