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My car is not starting up. I have checked the following, what else could I check?

  1. Measured the Battery Voltage and it is at 12V
  2. Tried to jump start the car from another car and also a battery jump starter, still did not start.
  3. There is some junk on the battery positive terminal. I got a clamp on the nut and checked the continuity from the clamp to the actual terminal and seems there is good contact so I dont think this may be the issue. enter image description here
  4. When I try starting the car, I do see some lights in the daskboard but the car wouldn't start. Do I need to change the starter? Here's what happens when I turn the key: https://youtu.be/HiyLE3r4FEQ
  • That's some serious bad corrosion you have in the battery connection, and I suggest redo them with new clamps and their respective screws, also clean the battery terminals with a wire brush, ideally the ones that have the wires inside a hole, so you insert the brush in the pole and turn it left and right for clean up. Like this one etrailer.com/static/images/pics/D/W/DW00254_2_1000.jpg – Aram Alvarez Nov 14 '16 at 1:03
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First of all, the connection you are showing us is more than likely the root of the problem. All of the corrosion inhibits a good connection. Get this cleaned up and lubed with grease to prevent further corrosion and you'll be in a lot better shape. After you get the connections cleaned up and you are still having an issue, we can better help you then. I'd highly suggest this is truly your issue, though.

Second, if your battery is at 12vdc, it is actually a bit low. This is still enough (in most cases) to start a car, but is lower than it should be. A good healthy battery should be around 13.1vdc. When the engine is running, the alternator should be charging right around 14.1-14.6vdc.

  • Use a water and baking soda mix with an old paintbrush to neutralize all that acidic gunk first, then scrape and brush away all corrosion. Use a wire brush on the clamp assembly and a battery post brush on the battery post. In situations this bad, I have seen corrosion that traveled up and degraded the wire for several inches back, necessitating cutting of the wire and new clamp installation. – Jimmy Fix-it Nov 13 '16 at 18:06
  • Paulster2 is exactly right. Older batteries, on their way out, vent more and the fumes cause more Anode terminal corrosion, exactly what we see here. 12VDC is too low for a healthy, fully charged battery. – kmarsh Nov 14 '16 at 2:40
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Larger comment sorry :)

So...That's some serious bad corrosion you have in the battery connection, and I suggest redo them with new clamps and their respective screws, also clean the battery terminals with a wire brush, ideally the ones that have the wires inside a hole, so you insert the brush in the pole and turn it left and right for clean up. Like this one http://www.etrailer.com/static/images/pics/D/W/DW00254_2_1000.jpg Connections should be pristine.

A battery can read 12 VDC, even 13+ VDC and however have not enough amps for the strong twist the starter demands, or just too weak to maintain the charge for a starter. It may charge, but at the first super-consumer attached, it will weak out.

However, if you jumped and still no crank, hear the starter how it sounds:

  • Nothing means current is not hitting the solenoid, check wires, check fuses, check if current is reaching the solenoid. Maybe the connection there is also corroded
  • A click sound means current hits the solenoid but it is not connecting the motor: bad solenoid, change it
  • "Hum"sound, like if the motor wants to turn but can't: seized motor, probably bearings are damaged, change it

Of course, you can adventure and take the starter out, do some tests and maintenance work and have it back working. Not complex, but you need to have some skills.

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