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I have a set of 215/65R16 winter tires on rims. A family member has a 2007 Pontiac Montana which currently has 225/60R17 tires. It seems like the 65R17 and 60R17 measurements make them close enough.

  1. Would it be safe for them to use my 215/65R16 tires/rims?
  2. Would the 225 vs 215 difference matter?
  • Your wheels might not fit over the Pontiac Montana brakes. Have you checked that yet? – cory Nov 8 '16 at 14:09
  • When changing rims, don't forget to verify the bolt pattern too. – user4896 Nov 10 '16 at 5:22
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For optimum performance they should be the same diameter, regardless of the rim size. For example 195 50 15 tyres have the same diameter as a 175 70 13 tyre. Though they differ in size, they make up for it in tyre height and width.

In your case, they will most deffintely be a different diameter. There are multiple issues with that, check for brake caliper clearance inside the rim, and for rubbing in the wheel arch lining. It will offset the speedo reading, and different rim size and weight can also put unnecessary stress on the steering rack.

Here is a link to a useful tool to compare what you need and help you understand tyre and rim fitment: www.willtheyfit.com

  • I misread your second paragraph and spent 5 minutes writing a rebuttal, but then, I reread it and realized that I had misread it. Could you make it more clear which issues are for the rim diameter and which issues are for the tire diameter, please? – Zach Mierzejewski Nov 8 '16 at 20:29
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The tire sizes you posted are not the same size, obviously. The big difference it one is a 16" rim while the other is a 17" rim. Fitment will be the big issue. The rims may not fit correctly over the brakes and other components.

If they do fit, my next concern would be how the anti-lock brakes, traction control and speedometer with react. All these things are calibrated to a specific wheel/tire size.

The first number is the tire width in millimeters (215 vs. 225). So going 10mm wider isn't a huge jump. The the next number is the aspect ratio, or height to width ratio measure in percent. It is the over all tire diameter that matters, so I would admit it may not be enough difference to be an issue (the diameter difference will only be 0.63"). This could cause the speedometer to be off about 1 mph.

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