12

In this video, the professional detailer talks about how "low-odor" solvent-based tire dressings can harden rubber hosing.

He goes on to say:

"I don't want this stuff on my tire if it makes rubber - y'know - that hard."


I don't question the ability for this stuff to harden rubber hoses in his vat since the stuff is continuously exposed to high concentrations of the chemical.

But I do wonder if his statement is applicable to tires in the real world for a few reasons:

  • he is out to market his water-based product, so there is a potential for conflict of interest
  • the solvent applied will eventually wear off the tire, unlike the rubber hose in his example, so the effect of the chemical reaction is somehow diluted
  • there are several commercial products that fall under this category which are not outlawed (to my knowledge) by international regulations
  • I have never seen a tire turn rock-solid due to extensive use of tire dressing
  • Great question. Wish I could +2. – DucatiKiller Oct 20 '16 at 20:42
  • #2 is wrong. Once the chemical reaction had occurred, it's leaving the reactant on the tire or hose that makes no sense. – Agent_L Oct 21 '16 at 13:34
8

Probably not, but...

There is no concrete evidence that tire shines do indeed effect the longevity of tires significantly. There have been reports of the possibility of petroleum based tire shines possibly effecting the longevity of tires, but there are no verified studies that prove this.

Water-based shines, as you said, are totally non-destructive to the tires, while some people have hypothesised that petrol-based shines can dry the rubber and cause it to crack. This is not documented.

That being said, the petrol products can damage the paint on your car if it gets sprayed off the tire.

355nation.net states one of the benefits of water-based dressings.

  • Water-based dressing also won’t harm the paint job if some gets sprayed on the body of the car.
10

According to Michelin, don't use petroleum based tire cleaning products

The general belief system that all tire cleaners or dressing are bad seems to be founded in Urban Legend.

Water soluable tire cleaners aren't listed by any manufacturers of tires to be detrimental to the rubber.

Michelin clearly states on their website the following.

Avoid the use of petroleum based tire cleaning products as they can exhaust the tire's oxidation and weathering agents within the rubber compounds, resulting in cracking.

Can I use tire cleaners? Avoid the use of petroleum based tire cleaning products as they can exhaust the tire's oxidation and weathering agents within the rubber compounds, resulting in cracking.

Under 'Tire Care and Maintenance' the above can be found at this URL.

I would have to say that if Michelin is steering individuals away from petroleum based products, they must have some concerns.

Additionally, the advice from Michelin states.

Use only non-petroleum based products or plain soap and water for tire cleaning.

Actual Harm to a Tire

The overall claim that solvent based dressings or cleaners do actual harm to a tire may be founded in fact but I cannot find a reference to the harm and what that might be. Only the claim that solvent based dressings and cleaners will do harm, as in this article.

Quote:

Some types of tire dressing actually damage the tire in the long run.

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