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For example, we have a 2008 Hyundai Accent. In Turkey, it is called "Accent Era".

Is it possible to install twin borgwarner turbochargers from two trucks and a supercharger from a Shelby GT500?

The 1.4 engine produces 96 horsepower. With the installation of the truck turbochargers and Shelby GT500 superchargers, can they increase engine horsepower and affect engine performance?

  • Short answer: No. Slightly longer answer: No, it's not possible without spending more on custom parts than the car is currently worth. – MooseLucifer Oct 10 '16 at 16:18
  • This question lacks the most basic understandings of how engines work. Please do some research on the basics before attempting to go balls to the wall on an Accent. – DJSpud Oct 10 '16 at 16:37
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    @Jhawins There's nothing about the engine that would render this project impossible. Rather than posting your comment, why not provide OP with a link to "the basics" so they can ask a more informed question? – MooseLucifer Oct 10 '16 at 17:05
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    OP doesn't know the implications of adding turbo/super chargers to a motor. They think it just means more HP. That is why I suggest OP does some googling.... First of all he has a small high revving motor, compounding turbos wouldn't make a lot of sense, nor would a supercharger. The whole question is just too naive to actually be answered.. On top of that, I'd love to see someone successfully layout any forced induction conversion in the Q/A format of this site.. It just won't work, there is too much information. If we really want to answer the OP the answer is "No, that's not how it works" – DJSpud Oct 10 '16 at 17:17
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    Unlike what anyone else here has answered, the real answer is: Absolutely you can do this. Like anything in the automotive world, it really depends on how deep your pockets are and how much you are willing to spend. Like everyone else who has commented and answered, the real question becomes, how well will this work. Answer: Not very well. Figure what is written in @SteveMatthews answer as a guide on what is possible. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Oct 10 '16 at 17:46
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I suspect a 96bhp 1.4 engine would struggle to provide enough power to spin up a supercharger and two turbochargers. I also suspect that the charging units you have chosen would not be well matched to your engine.

Might I suggest obtaining something like an IHI from a Lancia Y10 Turbo, a G40 G-ladder from a VW Polo 1.3 G40 or a Garret from an MG Metro Turbo. Any of these units would be far better suited to your engine.

Installing a turbocharger or supercharger involves reducing the engines compression ratio. This can be achieved in a number of ways but probably the easiest is to get a lazer cut metal sandwitch plate and install it either side of two head gaskets. Alongside doing this you'll need to fabricate a custom bracket and pulley if you're going to supercharger route or custom exhaust manifold if going the turbo route. Whichever route you go, you'll need to add some induction pipework to deliver the boosted air to the inlet manifold. You'll need to have the ECU ignition and injection MAP reprogrammed to suit, this is best done on a rolling road. You may also need an oil feed to the charging unit as many of them require lubrication.

If it is your intention to install both a supercharger and a turbocharger you'd encounter significant engineering challenges as you'd be effectively "twin charging" the car. This requires some serious hardware. I am only aware of three cars that use a supercharger and turbocharger, the Nissan Micra ice racer, the Lancia Delta S4 Group B rally car and the Mk5 Volkswagen Golf GT 1.4 TSI. The Golf is probably the closest vehicle to yours, being a road car with the same engine displacement. This car makes around 140bhp so it does represent a good gain (around 40%) in power.

I would suggest that, unless you have access to a good engineering facility, this is probably not the most cost effective idea.

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    +1 for "unless you have access to a good engineering facility" – DJSpud Oct 10 '16 at 17:19
  • Lowering the compression ratio may not be necessary, depending e.g. on the amount of boost you run. Using a spacer is not the best solution to lower the compression ratio. – Hobbes Oct 11 '16 at 7:38
  • I didn't say it was the best, I said it was probably the easiest. – Steve Matthews Oct 11 '16 at 8:24
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A few thoughts on why this is not as great an idea as it sounds:

  • the increased risk of detonation needs to be addressed if the engine is to survive for a meaningful amount of time. This could be achieved by reducing compression ratio (which requires engine modification), richening up the air-fuel mixture (which is bad for emissions) or intake charge cooling (which adds more complexity)

  • even if detonation is addressed there is only so much boost that a stock bottom end can take (pistons, connecting rods, rod bearings). To bolt on a twin-turbo'd + supercharged would mean that the bottom end needs reengineering if the full potential of such a setup is to be utilized

  • There is no such thing as free energy. And there is a point of diminishing returns. Running a supercharger off the crank will incur a certain loss of power. More boost = more parasitic losses, and it isn't linear. Turbos don't suffer from this issue as much, but physics is physics. Don't expect miraculous power gains just because the engine bay houses a turbo or two

  • Most of the fuel management system will need to be retuned or replaced. This will include the engine tune, air flow sensor(s), fuel pump and fuel injectors

  • Space constraints will limit what you can fit in the engine bay. If it doesn't fit, you'll have to figure out a way to make it fit because mechanical power doesn't get transmitted over wifi.

  • Lots of custom fabrication will be necessary to mount the additional hardware. This usually involves welding, making custom brackets, relocating stuff to keep things within the confines of the engine bay

  • Lots of money will be required to finance the above. Bucket loads of money.

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Turbo or supercharging this car is a waste of time and money. The transmission(s) used with this car will likely not handle much more power than it already puts out.

  • Welcome to Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair! This really doesn't answer the question of how the OP should go about turbocharging/supercharging their vehicle. Please take The Tour again to better understand how this site works. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jun 13 '18 at 22:21

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