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I just moved into a new house and planned on storing my 2015 Yamaha FZ6R in the garage, but upon moving in I realized one of the A/C units (think window A/C unit, but in the wall) emits all of the exhaust into the garage, making it reach temperatures up to 120 deg F.

I'm not only worried about the temperature, but also any humidity that may be coming from the A/C unit.

Should I not store it there? Any ideas on making the garage safe to keep it in?

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    Get an exhaust fan for the garage, best advice I can give you. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Aug 9 '16 at 20:37
  • What is your opinion on keeping it stored in the heat like this whether or not an exhaust fan is utilized. – TJ_ Aug 9 '16 at 21:13
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    I agree with @DucatiKiller. I don't think it would be an issue. The exhaust fan is just a suggestion if the excess heat bothers you ... besides, it would help the AC unit work better (read: cheaper). A small exhaust fan could drop temps by 10-20 degrees I'd bet, depending on the outside temps. That would save you a ton of electricity on the AC unit, as well as promote longevity for it. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Aug 9 '16 at 21:16
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I would not be worried

Your motorcycle will exceed these temperatures by far while running. Especially beneath the fuel tank which is directly above the engine.

You can expect normal operating temperatures well in excess of 180 degrees F beneath the fuel tank.

In regards to humidity, the AC unit should be draining water removed from the air of the space it is conditioning out of a vent tube outside. The water from the internal air-conditioned environment should not be effecting the heat exhaust from the wall mounted unit.

I have stored my motorcycles in conditions like this for years at a time and have not noted any adverse effects from it.

IMO this is a much better storage solution than the outside environment and is very close to an ideal storage space.

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  • I talked with a mechanic at a dealership earlier. He was saying that bikes are designed to run at temperatures well above 200 degrees, however, they are not designed to be exposed to extreme temperatures or blasted by heat while simply sitting. A few things he said to be wary of is tire degradation, coolant evaporation, battery leakage, and warping/cracking of vinyl. He said its a similar situation as to leaving bikes in the snow - he advises against it but it still occurs. Any thoughts on this? – TJ_ Aug 9 '16 at 21:07
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    There is no doubt that 120F will accelerate degradation of all rubber/vinyl products. As well, heat degrades everything. If your option to only store outside the cycling of hot/cold on the motorcycle will bring about dew and moisture on the bike daily. This is not advisable. Your 120F garage space will keep the temp static, a dynamic ongoing fluctuation will expand/contract all components twice daily. The moisture of outside storage along with the fluctuation in temperature is far more damaging than 120F. Motorcycles were designed to survive in Arizona where ambient air temp is 120+ – DucatiKiller Aug 9 '16 at 21:12
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Relax: Nothing will happen to the motorcycle,they are designed to withstand a lot more than you are mentioning here.

That said, I dont think you will run the A/C 24*7 for 365 days right? so you dont even have to bother about it, in the winter you will probably switch off the A/C so your issue is only for like the summer and some parts of other season.

I live in a tropical country where temperatures are usually near 100 to 115 degrees. I have had 3 motorcycles and not one time the issue was because of sitting in a hot place. The only issue I noticed once on a friend's motorcycle was that some paint came off but that I think is because of bad quality paint.

Also, my motorcycles sometimes stand in direct sunlight for hours together with no consequences at all apart from a very hot saddle.

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