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Mechanic wants $2000 for replacement -- do repair kits work? Anyone have experiences good or bad with them?

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    Make/model of car? Severity of damage? – Dalton D Jun 27 '16 at 21:17
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    @user1905416 It seems like you may be a new user to this stackexchange site. Welcome. Do note.. do you see the numbers to the left of the comment made by Dalton Dirkson? that means that people are agreeing with the comment. In this case you should read that as "At least three people have asked me for the make and model of my car" Oops. Subtle hint: If you want us to help you, providing the make and model of your car will go a whole long way. Who knows.. it could easily save you more than a thousand dollars. Its not clear if your tank is made of metal or plastic. Make / model info? – zipzit Jun 28 '16 at 0:35
  • Someone can edit the question and help the OP. It's they're first question. – DucatiKiller Jun 28 '16 at 11:19
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    Welcome to the site! Along with the make/model of the car, a picture would go a long way in helping us asses the damage. – MooseLucifer Jun 28 '16 at 12:44
  • Car belongs to a relative in Orange County CA, so I'm sure shop prices are high. Turns out the leak was into the bumper and creating a pool, so shop was insistent on replacing the tank immediately. Suspected cause was road debris, or collision with some fixed obstruction. Sorry, don't know make/model. Thanks for the good ideas, though! – user1905416 Jun 28 '16 at 22:28
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Long story short, yes it is an option. Whether or not it's a good one is another discussion.

Good News: finding a replacement gas tank and having a competent mechanic replace it shouldn't cost anywhere near $2000. Especially if you find the gas tank yourself. I'd be curious to know how your mechanic intends to fix your gas tank and add up his services to a total of $2000.

Bad news: in-place gas tank repairs are very hit or miss. You can find putty-like products that claim complete and permanent repair of gas tank holes, but these don't always work as advertised. I've known people that have tried all sorts of "tricks" to try and patch a damaged gas tank, the putty products and jb-weld type products included. Some have even tried simply welding the gas tank (this is a terrible idea if you haven't emptied the tank and you're not very careful or very good at welding, hello explosion)

To sum things up, I never mess around with gas tank problems. It makes me feel better to know that I have completely resolved the problem by just replacing the tank. It's too risky to assume that a quick-fix will hold through thick and thin and be able to perform whenever you need it to. Just my 2 cents.

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I wouldn't repair a gas tank. If the repair fails, it's going to be leaking gas, and I don't want to be sitting too near the tank when that happens.

$2,000 sounds very expensive to supply and install a gas tank. Get several quotes from other mechanics, including a local dealer.

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If you've had an accident of some kind there could be damage anywhere on the tank, and that damage might not be apparent. There could be cracks or distortion which weaken it and later cause a catastrophic failure. So to be sure you have a complete repair you would need to get it out of the car so all the damage could be found in the first place. Also, you'd want a welded fix not putties or patches as nothing else is really reliable, and again you'd want the tank out so it could be thoroughly emptied and aired out - fuel fumes in the right concentration are an explosive. If the tank is out of the car you may as well replace it with a new or used tank in good condition as most of the cost is labor.

2000 USD for a gas tank replacement sounds like a total gouge to me unless you have something very unusual, get a second or third opinion.

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I used the 2-part putty stick to repair the leaking tank on my 1968 Firebird, while it was actively leaking. I backed into a parking stop and bumped the tank, when it shifted a bit it caused pinholes where the support strap was contacting the tank. I was young and broke, so I never had a chance to replace the tank. The putty repair lasted 1 1/2 years until I completely wrecked the car and sent it to the junker.

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