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I drive a 2001 Chevrolet Silverado and I went out to start it so I could go to work this morning and it sounds like it's not getting any spark. it turns over and the solenoid turns on so its not the fuel pump. I've never had any real ignition problems so it makes me believe that this might be a really simple disconnection of a wire or something to the coils. I checked the fuses (inside and out) and nothing is blown. Any idea what this could be?

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    What do you mean it "sounds" like it's not getting spark? What's the sound of no spark? Did you check if it's getting spark? – I have no idea what I'm doing Jun 21 '16 at 15:01
  • When you say "it turns over" ... You mean you can actually hear the starter whir and the engine crank over? How do you relate the solenoid turning (which it doesn't really) to this not being a fuel related issue? Did you check your fuel pump relay? It is not unusual for a single coil to fail, but for the whole shooting match to fail without there being a fried fuse leads me to believe this is not an ignition issue. More than likely a fuel related issue. I'd need to know more, though to make a better diagnosis. I've owned an '00 Silvy, '04 Suburban, and currently own an '06 Silvy. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jun 21 '16 at 21:16
  • Fairly old question, but how fast does it turn over? If it still cranks but slowly, it could be a depleted battery that doesn't quite have enough juice to fire the engine. – MooseLucifer Sep 20 '16 at 22:22
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The easiest thing to check is the ignition coil: disconnect it and measure its resistance with a multimeter. You'll want to check your car's manual for exact values, but in general dead coils will have infinite resistance on the secondary winding.

If the coil is OK, you'll have to do a full-blown spark test. Note that having a spark plug tester or a set of spare spark plugs will greatly reduce the amount of work required and the chances of doing something wrong and damaging the engine.

  • With the coil over/on ignition systems, you can lose electronics on the coils and the secondary winding will still be good. Like I said in my comment above, if a fuse isn't bad, it's not likely you'll lose all of the coils at once. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jun 21 '16 at 21:25

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