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I have a 98 Mazda 6 to 6 who's paint is in pretty decent condition. however there is a little bit I've transferred paint and a few small scratches here and there that I'm planning on dealing with. obviously I have to wash it prior to doing touch up polishing and waxing. however I can't find a car soap here that is just soap, all have silicone or wax in them. I'm not worried about using wax remover because I don't think this car has never been waxed. could I just wash it this one time with liquid dish soap in preparation for my touch up work? I've heard people say never to use dish soap and I wanted to find out what the issues are.

marked as duplicate by JPhi1618, Bob Cross May 17 '16 at 13:20

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I'm going to be potentially controversial here and say yes.

The reason people say never to use washing up liquid is because it strips all of the waxes from the car. If you intend to subsequently apply wax, there is an argument to say that this is actually the best soap to use.

I've personally used washing up liquid followed by a thorough rinse and chamois to prepare a car for paint renovation (i.e. abrasive "cutting"), polishing and waxing and have to say that it works very well.

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    He could also use hair shampoo without conditioner. Its cheaper than dish soap and is generally easier on the paint. Plus the car smells nice. :D – race fever May 17 '16 at 20:26
  • @racefever - Shampoo cheaper than dishwashing liquid? Not in my neck of the woods ;-) – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 May 17 '16 at 21:47
  • @Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Guess that means your hair smells of Dawn. D: lol – race fever May 17 '16 at 21:55

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