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I did search "jack stand" and there are lots of posts that get close, but nothing that really covers the specifics of what I'm looking for here.

I have a 2000 Toyota Camry with 143k mile on it. My garage is not terribly wide and I need to jack up just the front to work on the brake calipers and pads. The normal jacking points according to the manual (Chilton's, etc), and according to the Toyota owners manual, is between two notches along the weld on the frame rail just inside of each wheel (just behind the front wheels, and ahead of the rear wheels). This is for a different model Toyota, but the jack point positions are essentially the the same.

Jack Points

Mine is also at the pinch weld.

So, I want to jack the front up all at once. I found a place on the frame and used a scrap 2x4 to cushion the frame from the floor jack. Since I need to hold up the front end, but due to the narrow garage I can't get under the passenger side to place that jack stand I need to find a place under the frame to put both stands.

So, my questions:

  • I have the rubber pads to protect the pinch welds for my stands. Do I need something else / better to protect the frame? I'm nervous about using that 2x4 because that seems very unstable.
  • Where on the frame can I place the stands? They have to be far enough apart to evenly support the frame, and that means wide placement. It's a front wheel drive car so things get complicated for finding strong frame points.
  • Is there a practical limit to how high I can jack the car? The stands are on the floor with nothing between them and the concrete garage floor.
  • Since I'm only using the stands with nothing between them and the frame, can I go high enough that I risk the car rolling backwards off the stands? (Granted, I do chock the rear wheels while doing this).
  • For how long do you plan to place the car on jack stands? – race fever Apr 4 '16 at 20:08
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    In a perfect world, 2 or 3 hours. Just long enough to change the driver side caliper and check the pads. If things so bad, could be 48 hours (over a weekend) while I figure out how to fix whatever I managed to break off.. :) – cdunn Apr 4 '16 at 20:13
  • you could place stands on the subframe mounting points. once weight is on the stands you'd be hard pressed to make the car fall off. as to how high you can go i you'll be limited by the height of the stands but tbh you only need to get the tires a few inches off the ground to check pads/replace the caliper. you could easily do this job in under an hour. – Ben Apr 8 '16 at 0:26
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I have the rubber pads to protect the pinch welds for my stands. Do I need something else / better to protect the frame?

The rubber pads should do the trick, as long as the pinch welds do not crush them down to the metal of the jackstand itself.

I'm nervous about using that 2x4 because that seems very unstable.

You really should not be nervous at all about using 2x4's placed between either the jack and the car or the jack stand and the car. There are several reasons why you want to use them, but the main reason why I use them is to distribute the load of the car over a broader area, which helps prevent damage to the car from the jack stands. The place I usually put them in a situation like yours is to put the 2x4 just inside the pinch rail where your image shows to put the jack. This area has the same basic support as the pinch rail does. By putting them just inside (away from you towards the inside of the car), you'll most likely find a flat/secure spot where you won't have any wobble from the 2x4 like you'd see at the rail. Ensure your 2x4 is long enough (I like mine at least 12" in length) to support the car without breaking in half (long ways). You'll find this not only supports the car, but will be very secure in the process.

Where on the frame can I place the stands? They have to be far enough apart to evenly support the frame, and that means wide placement. It's a front wheel drive car so things get complicated for finding strong frame points.

One place I've found on most front wheel drive cars to support the load is where you find a tie-in point for the front suspension. In the diagram you provided (and as @Ben mentioned), you'd be looking at the subframe mounting points. These areas will be well supported due to the fact they need to be in order to do their job. Placing the 2x4 along this area will distribute the load as well as provide excellent stability.

Is there a practical limit to how high I can jack the car? The stands are on the floor with nothing between them and the concrete garage floor.

Probably only has high as the jack stands would allow. You'd have to go to extreme measures to get more out of them.

Since I'm only using the stands with nothing between them and the frame, can I go high enough that I risk the car rolling backwards off the stands? (Granted, I do chock the rear wheels during this).

When doing front suspension work, only place the car high enough so the front suspension is completely extended, but the front tires are just off the ground. This will allow you to get the tires off without issue, but will be low enough you'd never have an issue with it rolling off the jack stands (as long as the vehicle is on level ground).

Again, I wouldn't worry so much about a 2x4 placement between the jack stand and the car. It is usually a little unnerving when you hear them creak a little when the car is put down on top of them, but I've never had an issue using them. You'll find what works for you

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