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I went to change the brake fluid in my 2000 Toyota Camry and when I tried to unscrew the bleeder nipple on a front caliper it broke in half rather than unscrewed. So, I need to replace the caliper since I don't want to deal with drilling out the old one in some way that doesn't leave shavings someplace they will do damage.

So, the specifics I'm looking for are:

  • What hardware if any should be replaced every time the brake line comes off the caliper? I know there's a brass washer for the banjo bolt, but what is the criteria for replacing it?
  • I'm going to do pads on both sides of the front since they're getting close anyway. Am I correct that there is no need to replace the other caliper as well?
  • Can I treat the threads on the bleeder nipple with anti-seize or is this just asking for trouble from the anti-seize contaminating the brake fluid?
  • What generally is the torque spec for the bleeder nipples? The Chilton / Haynes books are mute on the subject.
  • When the bleeder nipple came apart, I had my son press the brakes as far as they would go, and they are firm, and I watched the bleeder and no fluid escaped. Am I correct to conclude that this is safe to drive until I can get the caliper on there?
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What hardware if any should be replaced every time the brake line comes off the caliper? I know there's a brass washer for the banjo bolt, but what is the criteria for replacing it?

New/re-furbished calipers should include new washers. Always replace them when changing a caliper or line.

I'm going to do pads on both sides of the front since they're getting close anyway. Am I correct that there is no need to replace the other caliper as well?

Yes, you do not need to replace the other caliper. You should inspect and clean it as much as possible (a toothbrush works well).

Can I treat the threads on the bleeder nipple with anti-seize or is this just asking for trouble from the anti-seize contaminating the brake fluid?

No need to because you only tighten these very lightly. You just tighten them until they are snug.

What generally is the torque spec for the bleeder nipples? The Chilton / Haynes books are mute on the subject.

Just enough. Trial and error works here. As a general rule:

  • Screw it in with your fingers.
  • Use a wrench and go until you feel a bit of resistance.
  • Give it a light nudge without moving more than a couple of millimeters.

Pump the brakes. If they don't leak, then you are done.

When the bleeder nipple came apart, I had my son press the brakes as far as they would go, and they are firm, and I watched the bleeder and no fluid escaped. Am I correct to conclude that this is safe to drive until I can get the caliper on there?

It is only safe if you are absolutely sure it is not leaking fluid or letting air in.

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    Ok about safety, I'm really sure that this thing did not move at all when I tried to turn it, and I tested it against leaking fluid 3 times just to be sure. So yeah I'm really sure about no fluid coming out. Thank you for the great answer btw +1 – cdunn Mar 21 '16 at 16:52

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