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My question is similar this question but my focus is a little different. I have a 1982 Porsche 911 that has collected quite a number of chips and scratches on the front, mostly from rocks bouncing off the road and onto the hood. Some of the chips are deep and have started to rust.

I am planning on doing a thorough job on it in a few months when it gets warmer, including all of the sanding, preparation, paint and clearcoat with a paint gun at that time. However, I'm thinking that maybe I should do something temporary just to halt the rust until I can take the time to do it right.

My question is: should I do a quick rattle-can job now just to halt the rust, or leave it alone until I can take the time to do it right?

I don't drive the car much these days, and it is always under a car cover but not in a garage. I should also mention that the car is in a humid subtropical climate so that's a factor that may be relevant here. Also about six months ago, I started to work on it, but only got as far doing a little light sanding and using naval jelly.

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  • Is it just surface rust or something much more sinister? – Zaid Jan 8 '16 at 17:29
  • Just surface rust for now. – Edward Jan 8 '16 at 17:39
  • Can you add a photo? – HandyHowie Jan 8 '16 at 18:00
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    I would just seal over the rust with some paint using a very small brush for now until you do it properly. These spots won't grow very fast if you cover them, but it depends how long you are going to leave it. – HandyHowie Jan 8 '16 at 18:49
  • Great question, btw. Picture is worth a 1000 words here, too. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jan 8 '16 at 20:43
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You can get it covered with epoxy primer. If you have many pits and cavities, it would be best to go over the areas with a wire brush and then shoot your primer. I recommend a wire brush for the pitted areas vs a typical sanding block as it will not penetrate areas with depth. If moisture is trapped in there, expect it to corrode through.

It is best to prevent rust immediately. It will spread like a cancer and when you have the time to start this job it will be much more involved.

I do not know how deep the damage is, but you can use Tig or Mig welding techniques to fill them and then sand accordingly to the contour of the panel(s).

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