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BIKE

  • ENFIELD CLASSIC 350 2013 Model
  • ODOMETER: 14000
  • One and half year old
  • Oil changed one and half month before general servicing.

There is a particular sound from the engine while riding it in traffic.

Something like "cut-cut" or "tick-tick" you can say.

1st problem : In heavy traffic situations the engine gets hotter, and the sound appears in engine.

2nd problem : At the same time if I stop at signal and the headlights are ON the engine automatically turns off.

I showed it to 3 mechanics in Pune
The first time I encountered the issue I took it to Bullet Guru in Pimple Saudagar - He told me that the connecting rod or the piston might be the source of the sound and that he'd have to open the engine. I didn't proceed.

The next day I went for a ride and drove around 60kms with little traffic and there was no sound.

2nd mechanic in Wakad, Rajesh Automobile he asked me to change the silencer and that there was a problem with the engine

3RD - Kunal Bike Works in Viman Nagar who diagnosed it as a "problem with auto tension system in the engine or with piston"

What could be the issue?

  • it only comes when i drive my bike in heavy traffic and there is lot of clutch and gear usage i drove my bikw around 100km with less traffic in the city but dont able to mirror the sound – ojas yadnik May 6 '15 at 20:24
  • I deleted the response since it was incorrect. It's interesting that you have an engine that can continue to run after having piston to valve contact. You are a unique a beautiful snowflake. Best of luck to you. – DucatiKiller May 12 '15 at 10:17
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There are several places you can get a ticking sound.

Chassis

  1. Engine RPM Cable - The cable can kink or begin to backout of the cover and a ticking noise associated with engine speed may be heard.

  2. Speedometer/Speedometer Cable - Kinks, lack of lubrication or cable slowly backing out of the speedometer housing due to ongoing single cyclander vibration can create a ticking noise associated with kph/mph (aka how fast you are going)

  3. Drum Brakes - If it is a 'cut-cut' sound and not a 'tick-tick' sound, there is a possibility of a warped drum, it's very, very rare but I've seen it once or twice. The brake shoes would rub the drum once a rotation (perhaps) and create the 'cut-cut' sound.

  4. Wheel Bearings - (low probability) Wheel bearings could be going bad. You may hear ticking. You can test play in the bearings by putting the bike on a stand grabbing the front wheel. Push and pull the wheel laterally to the forks. If there is play in the axle, replace the bearings.

Engine

  1. Valve Gap - you pushrods and behind an access plate at the base of the cylinder you can find an adjustment for the pushrod. It's a simple locknut on a shaft. Simple to adjust. No parts necessary. It's a component of standard maintenance. It will make a ticking sound comping from the head or the small cover I described. It will be in time with your RPM's.

  2. Primary Chain Adjustment - you have a transimssion that is driven off the crankshaft by a primary chain. Similar to HD and old Triumphs. This chain is hidden by a cover on the left side of the motor. There is a cam to adjust the tension of the chain. Easy to resolve. A component of normal maintenance. Will make a slapping sound, perhaps a 'cut-cut' sound, it will be coming from the bottom left side of the motor. Due to the way the chain would 'slap' up and down based upon force, RPM, etc it may not seem in time with the motor or the road, at times. Depending on the RPM and what not.

  • i own the same bike. Let me try and explain the situation in my own words. It sounds like the piston is hitting the tappet. This issue is common to every royal enfield UCE engines. UCE engines are the newer series and has hydraulic tappets (the old models however did not have hydraulic tappets and getting it adjusted at the mechanics' were a very common practice). The authorized service center personal pointed out that its the automatic decompression working (that's plain nonsense). The old model bullets required decompression before kick starting or else it would back fire. – You_Shall_Not_Pass May 6 '15 at 5:18
  • You mentioned Valve gap, and that's the first time someone is pointing that out. I would love to read more about it and will get back to you with more information. In my case, the sound occurs even in the coldest of the mornings and the sound completely disappears after riding for 5 minutes. It has to be what you mentioned and I can be sure that it not the other cases. The "local" mechanics in our country know so much more and do better job of fixing the motorcycle (please accept that fact blindly) compared to the Authorized Service Center (aka ASS) are still getting to learn the new engines. – You_Shall_Not_Pass May 6 '15 at 5:24
  • @You_Shall_Not_Pass This may not be your model but this should give you a good idea of a pushrod enfield valve adjustment process. If you have the rocker adjuster motor where you adjust through the valve cover access hole there's a vid for that too. Here you go, in all it's glory. youtube.com/watch?v=4bmgJPyCUNU – DucatiKiller May 6 '15 at 6:34
  • I must apologies for saying, "the piston hitting the tappet". I did not have a clear understanding. And youtube does not stream in my office but wikipedia does. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_tappet Please read the first paragraph and tell me if that's what you meant when you said valve gap. – You_Shall_Not_Pass May 6 '15 at 7:43
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    The walls have ears. And Eyes.. lol.. – You_Shall_Not_Pass May 6 '15 at 9:20
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This is a common Problem in Enfield as Ducati kIller said.

Valve Gap - you pushrods and behind an access plate at the base of the cylinder you can find an adjustment for the pushrod. It's a simple locknut on a shaft. Simple to adjust. No parts necessary. It's a component of standard maintenance. It will make a ticking sound comping from the head or the small cover I described. It will be in time with your RPM's.

The Above is the primary reason for the sound, they expand in heat and start to make that noise.

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