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I need to replace shocks for my 2007 Ford Ranger. Is this something that can be done with little skill?

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  • To the close vote. How is this opinion based? There is a standard in the automotive world on the required skill level of a job, rated A, B, or C. This is a C level job. Apr 2, 2015 at 22:50
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    It wasn't my close vote, but I understand it. An average car owner has no idea on skill ratings for jobs. Also the skill ratings you refer to are not global by any means. I'd agree that this is far too opinion based. I'd find it easy but someone else may find it hard.
    – Rory Alsop
    Apr 3, 2015 at 23:10
  • @RoryAlsop Does the UK use estimating time guides for estimating time and cost for repair tasks? In the US we refer to them a labor time guides. Apr 4, 2015 at 0:11

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It's not difficult at all and can be done with basic tools. There will be one or two bolts on each end. Just take them off and replace with the new ones. It may help to take the tires off but may not be necessary. You will need to lift it up most likely depending on how much clearance is under the vehicle, it will make it easier if you lift it up.

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  • I have the original shocks and there are 120,000 miles on the car, are there any other problems that could arise from putting that many miles on the original shocks?
    – B ILICH
    Apr 3, 2015 at 0:46
  • @BILICH Other than some rusted bolts (possibly) and an overall rough ride, shouldn't be any problems Apr 3, 2015 at 2:57
  • One must be careful when releasing the the binding tape on the new shock. The shock will expand and get "too long" to fit in the shock mounts. Recompressing the new shock takes a lot of strength and/or leverage that the unprepared person can't do while under the truck. Be ready to "trap" the shock in the mounts when you cut that tape!!
    – Bill N
    Apr 6, 2015 at 19:47

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