12

Mech's seem to get a real rubbery one about Seafoam.

Is it just fuel additive, like something similar to Lucas Oil?

Do I just pour it into my gas tank as a gas treatment?

What will it do/help with?

  • 2
    Read this, this, and this, then let me know if you have any questions. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Feb 28 '15 at 1:31
  • Haha I get it now, this stuffs like fairy dust it does it all. In popped it in my tank thank you @Paulster2 – rhill45 Feb 28 '15 at 2:30
  • If u want the answer post it – rhill45 Feb 28 '15 at 2:30
13

Seafoam is a fuel additive which has several uses. Its primary purpose is to clean the fuel system of varnish and fuel deposits. It also cleans carbon from your combustion chamber to help reduce emissions and allow your vehicle to run better. You can also run it in your engine oil to remove sludge deposits. The following describes how you utilize the product in each of the different ways:

  • Fuel Additive: - Dump a can of Seafoam into your gas tank just before you fill up (yes, at the gas station). When you fill up the tank, it will thoroughly mix in with the gas and work as it should. In this process, your injectors are the main part you are cleaning.

  • Oil Treatment: - Use about 1/3 of a can dumped into the oil filler tube about 100 miles (or less) before an oil change. You need to run it for a little while so it can do its thing of cleaning the internals of the engine, but not so long as to cause issues.

  • Intake Tract Cleaning: - This part is a little more involved. For a complete rundown of how to use it this way, please read this forum post. Generally though, this process is as follows (I wrote this in another answer here):

First, this is a two person job. Second, pull the vacuum hose from the brake booster (not from the engine side). If you have a small funnel, put it into the end of the vacuum hose. Have someone start the car. They will probably need to rev the engine during the next part, but only enough to keep it running. With the engine running, slowly dump about 1/2 of the can into the funnel and let it get sucked up by the engine. This will cause volumes of white smoke, but not to worry. This is normal. When you get down to about 1/2 to 1/3 of the can left, dump the rest into the funnel and as soon as it is sucked in, have your helper shut the car off. Let the engine sit for about 10-15 minutes. After the wait is over, start the car back up. This may be a little difficult and again will cause a bunch of smoke. Keep the engine running until the smoke disappears. You have now successfully completed a Seafoam treatment. This will clean all of the carbon out of the intake tract, from the valves, and from the combustion chamber.

NOTE: This answer in no way is an endorsement of the product mentioned, it's just describing the product and its uses.

  • 3
    I'm not sure it's properly emphasized here, so I'll add: The "Intake Tract Cleaning" will create a whole lot of smoke! It's best to do that somewhere fairly isolated, where the smoke will most likely dissipate before it reaches anyone who might care. Depending on your car, there may be viable options other than the vacuum hose for the brake booster, and/or ways you can do the job solo. If you've never worked with the stuff before, it's probably best to find an enthusiast site dedicated to your vehicle where a detailed walkthrough and/or video has been posted. – Iszi Mar 2 '15 at 17:24
  • This process is very difficult to do by yourself, even for a person who has plenty of mechanical experience. And yes, lots of smoke potential. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Mar 2 '15 at 18:52
  • Just curious where's the difficulty? Pouring it slowly? – rhill45 Mar 3 '15 at 1:16
  • 3
    @rhill45 ... Keeping the car running while pouring it, and then shutting it off just after you dump in the last quantity. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Mar 3 '15 at 1:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.