1

I just did my upper control arm bushings on my Honda because it's lowered and I have an aftermarket control arm with camber adjustments. The wheel would pinch inward and send me toward the roadside. AutoZone and Advanced did not have the part I was looking for and I finally found them on PartsGeek upper "inner" control arm bushings. It's easy to take off but to replace the bushings, first we stripped a small vices' threads. Woops. We ended up getting them out with a larger socket than the bushing on the inside of the arm and a matching socket on the outside, penetrating spray and a lot of hammer beating. You have to do it evenly with very little room for error. The bushings that I've seen are steel outside, inside, with rubber or polyurethane in between that will break and the steel sleeves aren't the same length. Also the ball joint screw needs to be heavily lubed and you have to work the nut up and down the threads until you can do it with your fingers, or the ball will just spin and there's no way to pinch it. I would like to replace any bushings in the car that are very important. Besides the suspension, what other bushings are very critical components of the car, generically inferring?

  • 1
    I would bet the problem you are having is not with the bushings, but with the geometry of the aftermarket control arm and lowering. When you make changes (like lowering) you have to consider the trade-offs. Bump-steer is one of them. If it is not done absolutely correct, you'll experience these types of issues. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jan 31 '15 at 12:55
  • Now there was just a serious ice storm. I drove around all day in it and the next day at 10 degrees, I had a few feet of solid ice caked all the way around, after I chiseled it away my brakes froze for a moment later on while driving, no pressure. Also, today after all of the ice has melted, my hood latch cable is slightly dangling but when I take sharp turns I hear a popping sound like it's a ball joint. Would you suspect criminal mischief? – GettingNifty Feb 24 '15 at 2:33
  • As an answer, not as a comment to my answer. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jul 21 '15 at 21:12
2

I would bet the problem you are having is not with the bushings, but with the geometry of the aftermarket control arm and lowering. When you make changes (like lowering) you have to consider the trade-offs. Bump-steer is one of them. If it is not done absolutely correct, you'll experience these types of issues.

Today after all of the ice has melted, my hood latch cable is slightly dangling but when I take sharp turns I hear a popping sound like it's a ball joint. Would you suspect criminal mischief?

No. I would not suspect that. More than likely something failed in the car which has allowed it to happen.

0

It was the brake calipers getting stuck shut, the pads were so thin also they may have been binding from heat. I heard a ticking noise later which turned out to be the CV axle a result of it, but really just the spindle on the end of it. I replaced my rotors, calipers, pads, bearings and front axles regardless. The binding was a rusty caliper and the ticking was the CV axle. My bearings weren't bad.

0

First you need to use factory control arm or your suspension problems will be on going due to parts being stressed at wrong angles. There are bushing press kits that presses in the bushings, so the hard work is really how to dissassemble the suspension. Mind you the spring can kill you if you loosen the lower suspension without first clamping the spring. And cheap clamp can also kill you if spring slips.

Bushings are only found between suspension parts to dampen metal on metal contact.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.