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I do a lot of slow driving with multiple stops on trails and farm roads and the seat belt alarm becomes very annoying.
I attempted the following steps to disable the beeping, but they didn't work. I couldn't find any other different instructions except for small variations of these.
Any other ideas of how I could disable the seat belt alarm when the speed gets above 10 mph?

  1. Insert the key into the ignition and turn it to the "On" position. Do not crank the engine.
  2. Press the small knob on the instrument cluster to cycle between the trip odometer and the odometer reading. Press the knob until it displays "ODO." Turn the ignition to the "Off" position.
  3. Turn the ignition back to the "On" position and hold the small knob for 10 to 15 seconds. After the time has passed, put on the seat belt (while holding the knob).
  4. Release the trip odometer knob to finish. The instrument cluster will display "B off."
  • Are you looking for an electronic solution only? How about permanent, physical solutions? – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Oct 14 '14 at 18:32
  • @Paulster2 Preferably a reversible solution. But I'd like to hear both. – slybloty Oct 14 '14 at 18:38
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    Any option is reversible ;-) Just as an easy fix, have you tired just latching the seat belt behind you while you're driving? Two things besides this is jumping the seat belt wiring on the latch or disabling the speaker for the alarm. An outside shot may be ear plugs? Don't really know where you want to go with this. I doubt you're going to find a reliable electronic fix for this, seeing as how in the US (assuming you're from the US) the law is pretty clear about seat belts. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Oct 14 '14 at 18:55
  • Using a seatbelt while driving down trails will keep you safe. Using the latch or putting the seatbelt behind you is not a smart idea. I posted an answer for you. It took me less than 2 minutes to find a solution. Your question almost had the answer, it looks like you had the solution for the 2008 model. They changed it the following year. – HasH_BrowN Oct 16 '14 at 15:45
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For a really quick solution, try getting hold of a spare seatbelt from a scrap vehicle (I doubt the shape changes often, so I expect any reasonably recent Toyota would do, just get one that is the same as the belts in your car). Remove the tongue (The t shaped bit) from the belt, and keep it to hand - then, when you're driving on the trails and want to disable the alarm, simply plug that into the buckle - thus completing the circuit and switching off the alarm...

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    So making the seatbelts ineffective, to turn off the seatbelt alarm…question states riding on trails. I ride trails in my Jeep, with my seatbelt on. You answer is unsafe and dangerous. – HasH_BrowN Oct 16 '14 at 15:30
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    It is no more unsafe than your answer, though I will grant that yours is a more official one - it is the very practice of not wearing a belt that is unsafe (but that's the OP's prerogative, provided he is on private land), not the method of stopping the chimes... It certainly doesn't render the belts ineffective at any other time, as you'd remove the spare tongue and use the belt properly. – Nick C Oct 17 '14 at 10:51
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    Its unsafe because the seatbelt isn't being used for the intended purpose. My answer doesn't put the driver at risk, even if on private land, because the seatbelt can be used without rigging a buckle end up. I wasn't telling the questioner to not wear the seatbelt, but how to disable the chime for the times the seatbelt is put on and off during their rounds. – HasH_BrowN Oct 17 '14 at 14:48
  • it is the drivers prerogative if they wear the seatbelt, that's why i didn't downvote your answer. When bouncing down the trail, seatbelts dont help if not being used – HasH_BrowN Oct 17 '14 at 14:58
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The safe way of turning seatbelt chime/alarm off

During these steps, do not touch the brake at all

  1. shut the door.
  2. turn the key on and get your instrument panel on ODO and turn key off.
  3. turn the key back on, press reset knob immediately.
  4. hold reset knob for 12_15 seconds and fasten the seat belt.
  5. xxxx miles should turn to b_on.
  6. release and press one time, it should say b_off.
  7. wait for it to reset back to miles and turn the key off.

Seatbelt chime/alarm will be off.

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    Your instructions are just like the ones I wrote down in my question. They don't work on the 2011 model. – slybloty Oct 18 '14 at 20:15
  • @slybloty there are slight differences, but its similar. This does work on my neighbors 2011, I tried it on his truck because he got tired of the chime as well. – HasH_BrowN Oct 19 '14 at 7:38
  • Are there any other steps missing? Is that vehicle a manual or automatic transmission? Was it in park or neutral? Is it a double cab? Did you pull the key out before pressing the knob? Were the doors locked? I tried multiple variations of the above steps and couldn't get it to show b_on or b_off. – slybloty Oct 20 '14 at 14:18
  • No there aren't any steps missing. Either transmission and cab design should work, the neighbors is auto w/single cab. Key stays in whole time. Doors don't need to be locked.… – HasH_BrowN Oct 20 '14 at 15:43
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    Parking break is the missing link. Engage parking brake and do the steps above. – user9746 Mar 13 '15 at 5:42
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I'm late to the game, but maybe it helps others as well...

Your description should work, but there's one catch: make sure you follow the steps on the passenger seat not the driver seat.

You also need to press the knob once to toggle it from b_on to b_off as HasH_BrowN wrote in his answer.

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My wife recently had a ceaserian section and returning from the hospital was medically exempt from wearing a seat belt as the lap portion of the belt would pass directly across her scar.

To prevent the annoying buzzer from sounding we did nothing more complicated than passing the seat belt behind the seat back and plugging it into the clip.

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